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Old 09-23-2017, 03:34 AM
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Just a little rant, for those who are not interested... move along.

So an hour after I shut down for the night I get a phone call. The "Wolf" has a flat down on Water Street which is in the heart of the college drinking district. Uggg 10:00 pm and I have to get up for work at 3am.

So I jack the truck up and commence to changing the rear tire. Wolf indicates a cop had stopped to help but had indicated he had no idea how to change a tire on a pickup truck. Indicated he had changed many cars tires but never one on a pickup? Meanwhile the tire is not coming off the rotor... so as I'm wiggling and jiggling I told her that the cop was on the water street beat and just didn't have time to fuss with her tire. She said he had plenty of time as he waited with her for 40 minutes waiting for me to arrive until he got a call.

Tire not coming off so put the lugs back on loose... set truck down... roll it forward a couple feet and jack it up again. Didn't want to roll too far as tire was only 3 weeks old. Now it's 80 degrees and 70% dew point so I have started to leak/lactate everywhere.

Jack truck up and same thing tire will not let loose of the rotor. Losing my sense of humor. Put lug nuts on loose, jack it down, roll it forward , back up again. Same thing tire not budging. So now I commence Ninja kicking the tire to get it loose. About this time the officer shows back up. I am now violently ninja kicking and still no go.

Of coarse the cop is on duty so he is going to do his job. Which at the moment appeared to be ask of me as many questions in a row to figure out if the knight in shinning white armour has been drinking or not. And I am now in a one word answer mood which is peeking his interest. So as we are bantering back and forth I start to horse kick the wheel and it finally breaks free.

The cop was a super guy once he figured out I was sober. He was serious though, he did not have a clue how to change a tire as he had no idea how to lower the spare.

Are there any Boomers out there who don't know how to change a tire???
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Old 09-23-2017, 04:05 AM
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I'm neither a boomer or Millennial, I'm generation-x(born 63-80). I know how to change a tyre, I supplemented my apprentice wage in the early 80's working on a service station forecourt and in the tyre bay.(had to learn fast how to do stuff or have no job, because Dad's mate that owned the servo was not very tolerant).

I booked my son(gen-z) in to have two tyres replaced on his car yesterday, when I asked him today if they put the new tyres on the front he said "I don't know, but it feels better steering"...........oh, and I have showed him how to change a wheel.

Look out, Alpha's are coming.

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Generation Alpha: Yes, now we're onto the Greek alphabet. This generation begins with those born in 2010. It has been predicted they will be the most formally educated generation in history, beginning school earlier and studying longer. The children of older, wealthier parents with fewer siblings, they are already being labelled materialistic.

Last edited by o1xjr; 09-23-2017 at 04:33 AM.
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Old 09-23-2017, 05:44 AM
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I'm a Boomer and I'm proud to say that I definitely know how to change a tire!

Dwayne
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Old 09-23-2017, 06:49 AM
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I am also a boomer. Most of the millennials I know are essentially morons when it comes to common sense or financial awareness, particularly those who are under 30....
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Old 09-23-2017, 08:00 AM
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I don't know what label I am and have no interest in finding out but I can change a tyre so that's good, the memsahib can also change tyres but she does it by looking pathetic and having someone else do the grunting.
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Old 09-23-2017, 08:21 AM
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Changed a wheel on a delivery van at 4am in pitch black and no flashlight.
Did it by feel and knowing what to do. I had never driven that van before.
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Old 09-23-2017, 08:26 AM
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My son and daughter-in-law are both millennials but they are both also "old souls" for some reason. They actually exhibit a fair amount of financial responsibility and common sense. I'm sure there must be others; they can't be the only ones!

Dwayne
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Old 09-23-2017, 11:24 AM
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I know quite a few millennials, including my own kids. They come in a wide variety of flavors. Different attitudes, attributes, skill sets, etc. Just like any other generation.

I don't care if you're a boomer, millennial, gen x-er...whatever. If you don't know how to do something it's probably because A) you've never had any reason to know or B) you didn't want to know or C) you wanted to know but nobody taught you.

In the grand scheme of things tire failures are quite rare nowadays. There's really no overwhelming necessity to learn how to change one. I wouldn't size-up a person based on having or lacking that ability.

When I was in the car repair business and hiring technicians I was a bit shocked to discover that some of the young 'uns, quite capable, had no idea how to change a set of ignition points or overhaul a carburetor. It then dawned on me, of course, that they had no reason to know. Why would they?

I'm almost 60 years old and have no idea how to milk a cow, shoe a horse, or hand-crank a Model T. I never had any reason to learn how to hand-wash my clothes and hang them out to dry on a clothesline. Nor chop and stack a cord of firewood.

Cheers
DD
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Old 09-23-2017, 01:41 PM
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Millennial here, comfortable rebuilding engine but have no idea how to lower a spare tire from under a truck. I would probably figure it out if I had to, but that would require getting on the ground and looking at it.

Fortunately, the process is likely described in the manual, likely in the glove box, under "how to lower goddamn tire" chapter.
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Old 09-23-2017, 01:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon89 View Post
I am also a boomer. Most of the millennials I know are essentially morons when it comes to common sense or financial awareness, particularly those who are under 30....
I am a millennial, and we make fun of out of touch curmudgeon boomers with Old Economy Steven memes.

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Old 09-23-2017, 03:17 PM
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I would be an "Olde Fart" who has changed tires, picked corn in the hot middle of summer with a machete, being taught how to by a Bracero, plus many other chores from living on a farm.
Also (as noted above) washed my own clothes and hung them on a line outside.
Changed plugs and points....etc...
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Old 09-23-2017, 05:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayt2 View Post
I would be an "Olde Fart" who has changed tires, picked corn in the hot middle of summer with a machete, being taught how to by a Bracero, plus many other chores from living on a farm.
Also (as noted above) washed my own clothes and hung them on a line outside.
Changed plugs and points....etc...

No matter what generation we fall into we often learn different things simply in accordance with our particular environment.

Cheers
DD
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Old 09-23-2017, 09:30 PM
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I guess I'm stuck between Generation X and Millennials, because as I understand it, I overlap both.

Anyway, once when I was 16 I was cruising around the countryside, and encountered an "elderly" neighbor (more busted up than old) who had a flat tire on his 3/4 ton Ford pickup (where I grew up TRUCKS are Large, heavy duty vehicles not the play-toys called trucks in California) with 16 inch 8 ply mud & snows. When I rounded the corner he was hobbling here and there between tools and the tire, fumbling with the jack.

In that rural area people depended on each other, so when someone needed help and you were able, you just did what you could! No fanfare or anything, it was considered not so much a civic duty as a moral obligation. So I stopped and changed his tire for him and threw the flat in the back of his pickup. When he tried to PAY me I was So embarrassed! He got his wallet out and everything! HA! I wish him well and left.

So instead he told my dad what I had done, in what I understand were quite glowing terms.

Geeez!!

Then, after I was commended for helping out the neighbor who today would be called disabled, I had to explain what I was doing over there in the first place!

That's where I learned my first Real lesson in Human Relations:
*No Good Deed Goes Unpunished.*
(';')
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Old 09-23-2017, 10:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LnrB View Post
Then, after I was commended for helping out the neighbor who today would be called disabled, I had to explain what I was doing over there in the first place!

That's where I learned my first Real lesson in Human Relations:
*No Good Deed Goes Unpunished.*
(';')
A lesson well learned, I'm sure!
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Old 09-24-2017, 04:04 AM
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Originally Posted by SinF View Post
I am a millennial, and we make fun of out of touch curmudgeon boomers with Old Economy Steven memes.

I resemble that quote.

So I was at Farm and Fleet picking up a couple new heated waterers for my chickens. Big bold letters "New and Improved design", "Easy Fill", perfect I thought as when it's 20 degrees below 0 easy fill will come in handy. So the fill hole is on the bottom of the waterer with a rubber plug? You have to tip the waterer over spilling it everywhere and pop the rubber plug in order to fill. Now the top of the waterer is round and flat. Would not putting the rubber plug on top make more sense? Keeping in mind 20 degrees below zero dumping water all over not so good.

I work with a Millennial and we joke about this type of stuff all the time. He takes it pretty well as I go off on this or that rant. So as I am ranting on how some college educated Millennial designed this waterer with the fill plug on the bottom he just smiles and says "you know, that's the nice thing about you Boomers, you'll by anything we design. Ugggg!
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Old 09-24-2017, 04:46 AM
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I used to be down on millenials and some of their apprent cluelessness, but the more I see the more I think that many have been badly let down by what passes for an education system and pandering parents that never let them build any resilience.

At the other end of the spectrum I have become the default IT support person in my local car club. I find the attitude of some older people frustrating (keeping in mind I am a senior citizen myself). It one thing not to know something but making no effort to learn and throwing your hands up and giving up just sucks in my view.

In the end it comes down to the individuals IQ, natural aptitudes and personality type regardless of age. The smarter ones will have the desire to work stuff out and the basic capacity to gradually learn how things work.
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Old 09-24-2017, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by yarpos View Post
I used to be down on millenials and some of their apprent cluelessness, but the more I see the more I think that many have been badly let down by what passes for an education system and pandering parents that never let them build any resilience.

We're getting off into the weeds a bit here but I think it's parents more than the education system, personally. I might come back later with more on that....with an example that actually includes *changing a flat tire* !


Quote:
At the other end of the spectrum I have become the default IT support person in my local car club. I find the attitude of some older people frustrating (keeping in mind I am a senior citizen myself). It one thing not to know something but making no effort to learn and throwing your hands up and giving up just sucks in my view.

In the end it comes down to the individuals IQ, natural aptitudes and personality type regardless of age. The smarter ones will have the desire to work stuff out and the basic capacity to gradually learn how things work.
I agree.

The old saying about "learning something new each day" is something I take to heart. It was drilled into me beginning at an early age.

And some people seem to have more 'natural curiosity' about things than others.

More later. Chores to do !

Cheers
DD
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Old 09-24-2017, 03:47 PM
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Curmudgeonly is such a great word.
You may laugh, but you will be there someday.
Oh yes, we know 😊
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Old 09-24-2017, 04:34 PM
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IMHO I think games consoles are the crux of the difference.
We didn't do beat em up games on screen, we did martial arts and real street fighting.
We didn't do racing bikes or cars on a screen we did it on tracks or illegally on the road. We tuned our bikes and cars for real. We went skiing for real not on an iPad. We went swimming in the sea in the middle of winter. We climbed mountains. We walked so far over mountains but never needed GPS. We grew our own inbuilt gps. We trespassed where there were fences and we didn't see there should be to get where we were going. We worked as volunteers on a steam railway.
We did everything for real. We drank in pubs aged 16 onwards. We got hurt, we blead, we broke bones, we got scarred, we laughed so long and so hard we got gut ache. We carried weapons, we jumped out of buildings (don't ask), we stole gunpowder chemicals to make home made fireworks, we scoured landfill dumps for bicycle parts to build bikes and sell them. Us two brothers took the whole village kids on and beat them. We worked at weekends aged 11 and 12 for pocket money. We earned it and never held a hand out for it. We wanted it, we made it or worked hard for it. We never quit. We never flaked. We never flinched. We never flunked or flounced. We learned the playground rules of consequences. You thrashed it and crashed it and you mended it.

A virtual life on a screen or a real life?
Us old curmudgeonly fellas painfully know the difference. You might break a nail on a keyboard but thats about it.
I self taught word, excell, Microstation (OK I was already an autocad user) Internet. Who the hell needs to go on a course??

A screen life? No sorry it doesn't count.

Maybe a time is coming when there will only be virtual life? When the AI dictates what you are allowed to see and when it feeds from your bio-energy via your neural lace. I won't be there.

​​

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Old 09-24-2017, 09:20 PM
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Come Busa, the Matrix is calling it is warm and comfortable, mmmmmm
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