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Today's NY Times-- thoughts?

 
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Old 03-22-2019, 03:07 PM
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Old 03-22-2019, 03:15 PM
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Wishful thinking by the New Left Times.

Around 1900, the horse and buggy began to be replaced by the automobile. At first, only wealthy people could afford a car, but eventually mass production made cars affordable for everyone. Today, many people own several cars. But only wealthy people can afford a horse!
 

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Old 03-22-2019, 03:16 PM
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I couldn't get past the article's headline without laughing.
 
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Old 03-22-2019, 03:23 PM
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IMO, this will come sooner in densely populated cities. It will be less effective in the suburbs and a major challenge anywhere outside of a suburb. Inner/ inter suburban buses are empty daily except rush hour. Here in the US, we're still using passenger trains built in the 60's on tracks rented from freight carriers. It takes three days to get from MPLS the Seattle via rail. Think Texas. 660 (1060 Kilometers) miles across at it's widest points. I can see autonomous trucking working well in rural America. I can't see it working with smaller vehicles. Doesn't mean I'm right, All that said, with American consumers now needing 6 years to finance a new car, the incentive for alternatives is certainly there.
 

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Old 03-22-2019, 03:35 PM
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Agree with Sean, where I live is quite rural and can't imagine them doing without a car in my or my kids era's.

My Mum now 78 who lives in London stopped driving 10yrs ago, her rationale was that she could take a taxi anywhere she needed and would save money on the costs of a car, 10yrs later she has no regrets and a healthy bank balance. But then she did just 2k miles a year when she drove!
 
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Old 03-22-2019, 04:01 PM
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I agree with the Densely Populated areas possibly getting to 90% within maybe 20 years, but anyone NOT in a major city will still require personal transportation.

Of course........ places in the world like Europe, where the next COUNTRY is merely a day away, the Western US (most of Canada, and probably all of Australia, China and such) the next decent TOWN is a few hour drive.

So yeah, no, maybe depending on one's specific locale. Me; No, I'll need my own ride for as far into the future as I can imagine. Besides, mere 'Transportation' is not my reasoning for an XKR. I'd have one anyway, just for fun.
 
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Old 03-22-2019, 05:12 PM
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While I agree with some parts of the article, it is more driven by lack of interest in driving by young people who would rather be playing video games on their cellphones than paying attention to where they're driving. However, State and federal governments are not going to go quietly in the night with the lack of gasoline taxes that fund many other projects and pensions than just highway maintenance. Some states where there are significant electric powered vehicles are already charging an annual fee with the normal registration to make up for lost revenue. In California, there are currently approximately 35,000,000 registered vehicles driven an average of 13,600 miles annually. That is roughly 470 BILLION miles per year. The states will start taxing public transportation as well as companies like Lyft and Uber to make up for lost revenue, and cars will remain a mainstay of most families. But, I hope the author is right, It would be nice to have less traffic in Los Angeles where the 5 mile ride up the 405 grade from Ventura Bl. to Mulhullond drive is typically an hour and a half trip on a weekday morning.

And also, look at the source of the article, the New York Times, not exactly the greatest purveyor of truth on this earth. let alone its predictions. accuracy.
 
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Old 03-22-2019, 05:22 PM
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I heard we're going paperless in the office.

Not sure when, though.
 
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Old 03-22-2019, 05:50 PM
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The headline is admittedly click-bait-- even the author admits the "carless era" may be a while in the future, and she's being optimistic.
Also, if you read closely, the "urban area" near where she lives is San Francisco, which also says a lot.
On the other hand... I have friends with kids of driving age. Unlike me (and everyone I knew), those kids seem to be in no hurry to get driver's licenses once they're old enough. It's completely foreign to me. So we'll see, I guess.
 
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Old 03-22-2019, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by tberg View Post
.....................And also, look at the source of the article, the New York Times, not exactly the greatest purveyor of truth on this earth. let alone its predictions. accuracy.
" Ms. Swisher covers technology and is a contributing opinion writer. "
Clearly a Filler Article, not breaking news.
 
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Old 03-22-2019, 07:01 PM
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Started to read it.
Got bored.
Went out in my car and bought some beer.
My only real worry is that I will be too old to enjoy this dystopian future that I have been hearing about for the last 40 years.
 
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Old 03-23-2019, 08:47 AM
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I'm anxiously awaiting an autonomous electric lawn mower! Now that will improve the world.
 
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Old 03-23-2019, 10:08 AM
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Old 03-23-2019, 07:09 PM
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Interesting but have not seen it in the U.S. yet. Price?
 
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Old 03-23-2019, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by SickRob View Post
Interesting but have not seen it in the U.S. yet. Price?
looks like 875 pounds in the article scroll to the bottom and it has price
starts at 875 goes as high as 4600 pounds
 
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:17 AM
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People who live in large metro areas often have trouble having any sort of concept that stuff isn't the same everywhere as where they live.

Stuff that works in NYC may not work in any of the less densely populated areas. I live in Grand Rapids, MI and we're not a super small city, but out our public transit system is horrific and doesn't extend to the majority of suburban neighborhoods. Not having a car literally keeps you in a lower class not able to really raise yourself up. The idea of sharing a car won't go well either because most of us here have boats, atvs, dirt bikes , and property to where ability to haul stuff is a big deal.

While major cities can have less cars, that's not all of America by a long shot.
 

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Old 03-24-2019, 10:50 AM
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Americans, on the whole, are still firmly in love with automobiles.

But the big city vs small town difference is very real.

I've had relatives who lived in big cities and public transportation was simply the easiest, most practical choice. My youngest lived in Seattle for a few years and loved public transportation....or Amtrac for longer journeys. Her car often sat unused for days at a time.

As much as I love cars and driving, I'll gladly use a taxi or public transport (or hornswaggle someone else into driving!) if I'm in the 'big city'. Slogging thru gridlocks, one-way streets, finding parking, door dings, etc is not my idea of enjoyable driving.

Without going too far into the weeds, I think we've all seen attempts to introduce or expand public transport into areas where the majority of people simply_don't_ want_it. Massive amounts of money spent...for naught. "Build it and they will come" doesn't always pan out.

Cheers
DD
 
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Old 03-24-2019, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by pk4144 View Post
. I have friends with kids of driving age. Unlike me (and everyone I knew), those kids seem to be in no hurry to get driver's licenses once they're old enough. It's completely foreign to me. So we'll see, I guess.

I've seen this as well. Youngsters not quite so in love with cars and driving as we are/were. It was an essential rite-of-passage in my day.

My own kids weren't terribly exciting about driving. We had to nudge them into it......primarily so their mom and I didn't have to spend half our lives transporting them from one place to another.

Cheers
DD
 
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Old 03-24-2019, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by 80sRule View Post
People who live in large metro areas often have trouble having any sort of concept that stuff isn't the same everywhere as where they live.
And they're saying the same about those living in small towns or rural environments.

I can't remember when this wasn't an issue to some degree or another....but nowadays, IMO, it's becoming a very real (and often acrimonious) "divide"

Cheers
DD

 
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Old 03-24-2019, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by tberg View Post
While I agree with some parts of the article, it is more driven by lack of interest in driving by young people who would rather be playing video games on their cellphones than paying attention to where they're driving.
Or even walking!

However, State and federal governments are not going to go quietly in the night with the lack of gasoline taxes that fund many other projects and pensions than just highway maintenance. Some states where there are significant electric powered vehicles are already charging an annual fee with the normal registration to make up for lost revenue. In California, there are currently approximately 35,000,000 registered vehicles driven an average of 13,600 miles annually. That is roughly 470 BILLION miles per year. The states will start taxing public transportation as well as companies like Lyft and Uber to make up for lost revenue, and cars will remain a mainstay of most families.
You're right

But, I hope the author is right, It would be nice to have less traffic in Los Angeles where the 5 mile ride up the 405 grade from Ventura Bl. to Mulhullond drive is typically an hour and a half trip on a weekday morning.
I remember it well, having lived in LA for 29 years

I'm returning next week for a visit....after 20+ years away.

Not sure what to expect.

We used to race on Mulhollond Drive. Do they still do that?

And also, look at the source of the article, the New York Times, not exactly the greatest purveyor of truth on this earth. let alone its predictions. accuracy.
Well, yeah, but it's obviously a fluff/opinion piece, not a news story. Not the type of thing we'd have to run to our fact-checker on

Cheers
DD
 

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