XJ6 & XJ12 Series I, II & III 1968-1992

Alaskan Xj6/LT1

 
  #61  
Old 05-17-2019, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by JaguarSpecialties View Post
The shims between the lower pivot brackets and the diff case itself are there just to adjust for tolerances in the manufacture of the rear suspension cage. Once the diff is installed back in the cage the brackets and long fulcrum shafts are brought to the assembly. Shims are used (same amount, front and rear) to get the bracket mounted to the diff such that the fulcrum shaft slides smoothly all the way through both the cage holes and the bracket. You may or may not need any shims depending on tolerance buildups. That's it. Your original shims likely corroded away and fell out. The safety wire is original and it may very well be that no one has been in there since the car was new.....

I hope that helps

Andrew
Jaguar Specialties
I finally did a custom "adjustment" to one of my pullers and built another set of puller arms to remove the outer hub bearing and seal ring. Here's a couple of pictures, I don't think this butcher job would be done at the factory. Cold chisel and hammer looks like the main tools used. I will have to replace the seal ring because of



a scratch/groove around the outside and a few nicks too. I hope I can stone and polish the hub into better condition, those things are expensive! I didn't take a picture of the safely wire.
Dave
 
  #62  
Old 05-23-2019, 08:02 PM
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[img]
Front spring compressor. Black "puck" is ball bearing wheel stud installer.
A friend of mine told me that I should "pay it forward" as I make progress with my project and learn the way of the Jaguar. I'm going to show a couple of the tools I have had to make since February when I pushed the car into the shop.
[img]
Spring compressor for front springs. Black "puck" is a ball bearing wheel stud installer. Works great.

1-5/16" 3/4 drive socket as driver and 2" Lennox hole-saw with teeth ground off. Perfect driver and support to remove front radius arm bushings.

2" 3/4 drive socket; floor bracket for 1" GIP ground down a little; 3-5/8" Lennox hole saw with teeth ground off. Perfect fit for removing large radius arm bushing.

Spring compressor for rear coil-over shocks. 3" exhaust flange for one end and 2-1/2" for the other. 7/16" all-thread and gr8 nuts/washers.

In operation.

Had to grind a couple of carridge bolts to get under the tiny lip of outer hub seal ring.

Not having the Factory tool to press the inner hub bearing to its nominal position prior to measuring and adjusting hub end-play, I made a pair of distance shims out of washers, but I have to grind to OD. Hence, the small self-centering tool to hold the washer while I try to make it smaller but still round.
 
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  #63  
Old 05-24-2019, 10:33 AM
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Thank you so much for this Tool Time Tip.
Yesterday evening while on my way to one of my usual haunts, Nix was acting a bit squirrelly upon deceleration and hard braking. Having learned in here that this situation will only get worse, I said to myself, "Self," I said, "You are about to learn to rebush the cage."

And here was me thinking I had no critical Jag project for next winter. TSK!
(';')
 

Last edited by LnrB; 05-24-2019 at 10:38 AM.
  #64  
Old 05-24-2019, 09:50 PM
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I don't know why the front spring compressor picture wouldn't upload, tried it twice. If you'd like to see the "beta #1 and beta #2" in this thread in post #48, the current version is very similar to #2. I am also posting another pic of a critical step when you have a difficult large bushing removal on the radius arm.
[img]
Here is the culprit with about 10-12 tons of pressure and no movement in sight. I decided to give the "floor bracket" press plate a slight rap with a punch; broke loose immediately. Did the same thing with the other radius arm, same result. Just a medium whack is all I needed.


current version.
 
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  #65  
Old 06-12-2019, 09:29 PM
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Well, I just finished rebuilding my rack and thought I would add a couple more "tools" I had to make.

Installing new pinion valve seals in like putting socks on a rooster! Apparently, Jag mechanics have a tool that expands the seals and then another one to shrink them back to size. Piece of chocolate tube and some lube and those mechanics got 'nuthin on me.

So far, I have scraped the old undercoating out of 3 wheel wells. Not a pleasant job if you are 6'3" and have a bad back. I made scapers out of 1/8" plexiglass and put a bevel on the end. Don't use the bullet-proof stuff, too soft. Plexiglass is much harder, but will not cut through good paint-they'll hold an edge a long time.

Forgot to explain the other items in last picture. The tube with bolt through it is what I used to install a new "olive" in the pinion housing. This was after I ruined one. The other tool is just a drill bit J-B welded into a piece of aluminum to use when centering the rack. In this picture is a piece of 3/8" UHMW with a hole, relief slot, and tightening screw I used to turn the pinion when the rack is put together. I can't turn the pinion with my fingers.
 

Last edited by LT1 jaguar; 06-12-2019 at 10:07 PM.
  #66  
Old 06-12-2019, 10:06 PM
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I was too wordy in the last post, ran out of space under the last picture. Piece of copper tube is to cover the splines on the pinion as you are trying to slide into the pinion valve housing. It's impossible to push through the pinion seal without opening it up first because it faces inward and you are trying to push the pinion through it the wrong way. 3/4" copper pipe is idea with its 7/8" OD and 3/4" ID. I inserted the tube from the outside and just through the seal (going the right way with the seal). Then when you insert the pinion valve in the other end of the housing, you simply push the tube out with pinion and slip past the seal at the same time. I'm not proud in saying that I spent a number of hours last night and a good part of today figuring out why I couldn't push the pinion valve all the way into the housing. I thought is was the last valve seal that kept hanging up. A trip to Lowes with my dial calipers netted the piece of tube. The Jag shop manual cavalierly tells you about this tool and that, complete with part numbers, and if I had them my rebuild would be easier. Unfortunately, I have misplaced that collection of tools.
Dave
 
  #67  
Old 06-24-2019, 10:10 PM
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This may not be the way to do this, but I don't know another way. Awhile back I posted on an old thread "questions for the v8 conversions" by sunchip (5/17/21017). My post is the last one, #39 and I am looking for comments or opinions concerning stock vs one-piece drive shaft. If anyone has any experience in this matter, I would be grateful for an opinion.
Dave
 
  #68  
Old 06-25-2019, 07:43 AM
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Dave

Having had four Lumps with one piece drive shafts..I do not see the need for two piece.. mine were properly balanced with new yokes. I never felt any vibrations..just be sure the bolts and washers and nuts in the rear are properly tightened.

Roger
 
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:17 AM
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My car has a one-piece drive shaft, and as it was my first Jaguar experience I didn't know it didn't come that way.

Since that time I have been under many other Jags in wrecking yards still with their OEM 2-piece drive shafts, and it seemed to be another instance of BL making things needlessly complex.

My work truck has a 2-piece and on the farm we had center bearings, but only on big trucks; vehicles with potential for heavy loads; sometimes Very heavy loads (I loaded my truck down to the overload springs with head-size river cobbles one time, Well over it's rating).
https://mechanics.stackexchange.com/...ce-drive-shaft

I can only see 2 more U-joints to be concerned about (and maintenance thereof) by putting one of these in a passenger car of normal length. In Stretch Limos probably, due to the length, but not our Classic Xj6s.
(';')
 
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  #70  
Old 06-25-2019, 10:22 AM
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I have two coupes one with a 1 piece and another with a 2 piece shaft for direct comparison. I had both shafts made and balanced by a well known drive shaft company called fastshafts. They're great and have made many high quality products for me over the years. We're on a first name basis...lol.

I wouldn't say the 1 piece "vibrates" but it's certainly not as smooth as my coupe with the 2 piece. With the 1 piece there is what most people would call a hum. Technically speaking I'd call it a harmonic. The 1 piece car is my race car that has hits speeds of about 130 but I can start feeling the difference between the 1 piece and 2 piece cars at about 60 MPH, by 80 is more apparent but by 130 with 3:73 gears it's noticeable. The 2 piece car is so much smoother at highway speed but you 'd have to drive both car back to back to really notice or appreciate the differance. I notice vibrations and noises most people dont, that said if you want to take your convert to the next level do a 2 piece. If it just needs to be good enough then do a 1 piece. There isnt a large cost differance, about $40 to 60$ and for me well worth it. The race coupe will be getting a 2 piece for next season.

LnrB....
The early 1960's Mark X and later 420G had 2 piece driveshafts as well. Those cars and the XJ's drive line were designed in the late 50's long before BL got their hands on Jaguar. Early XJ sedans use the same style center mount as the 1961 Mark X. Somewhere in the late 70's jaguar revised the center mount design. This shows the engineers took the time to redesign it and not just eliminate it becasue it was clearly advantageous to the car's driving experience.

Having driven many cars with a 1 piece vs a 2 piece, including XJS' , they use a 1 piece. I firmly believe the 2 piece is advantageous to a sedan smooth running and not an engineering excess on Jaguar's parts. The transmission mount allows lots of movement at the back on the engine and that's a big difference and another reason for using a 2 piece shaft. There are many luxury and high performance cars, past and present, that use 2 piece shafts. Keep in mind that the early Jaguars sedans had 3:31 or higher gears so the shaft on those cars would be turning much faster than it would be on a later 2:88 car and thus the need for a 2 piece shaft to retain smoothness. On the shorter geared early cars the effect would be amplified.
 

Last edited by icsamerica; 06-25-2019 at 02:06 PM.
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  #71  
Old 06-25-2019, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by icsamerica View Post
I have two coupes one with a 1 piece and another with a 2 piece shaft for direct comparison. I had both shafts made and balanced by a well known drive shaft company called fastshafts. They're great and have made many high quality products for me over the years. We're on a first name basis...lol.

I wouldn't say the 1 piece "vibrates" but it's certainly not as smooth as my coupe with the 2 piece. With the 1 piece there is what most people would call a hum. Technically speaking I'd call it a harmonic. The 1 piece car is my race car that has hits speeds of about 130 but I can start feeling the difference between the 1 piece and 2 piece cars at about 60 MPH, by 80 is more apparent but by 130 with 3:73 gears it's noticeable. The 2 piece car is so much smoother at highway speed but you 'd have to drive both car back to back to really notice or appreciate the differance. I notice vibrations and noises most people dont, that said if you want to take your convert to the next level do a 2 piece. If it just needs to be good enough then do a 1 piece. There isnt a large cost differance, about $40 to 60$ and for me well worth it. The race coupe will be getting a 2 piece for next season.
I glad to hear about your experience. I have never ridden or driven a car with 2-piece drive shafts so I don't have a personal reference. With the conversion, one of the shafts will have to be reworked and I thought a 1-piece would simplify things. There will be nothing about this car that will be "just good enough" when I'm done. I'm **** to a fault and have a "it's either right or it's not right" mentality. My other concern was the rubber dampener connection between the two pieces of one of the shafts (front?). This is the same type construction used in the stock suspension joints and is very strong while absorbing vibration, etc. My stock shaft is 34 years old and has been sitting around somewhere for the last 14 years so I'm questioning it's ability to soak up horsepower. But reading your comments about one of your race cars getting a 2-piece shaft, that shouldn't be a concern. I'll just have to decide how to cross that bridge when I get to it. Thanks again.
Dave
 
 
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