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MKI / MKII S type 240 340 & Daimler 1955 - 1967

67 MK 2 restoration

 
  #21  
Old 11-23-2015, 10:10 AM
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Success!


That was pretty easy, so thanks for the tip. Making it run and look nice under there a little more of a challenge.

I got some good news on the other car this weekend. I was worried about my ability to get the slightly crumpled front fender/wing properly repaired. There is a very exceptional metal worker here at a local shop, and I was able to make arrangements to have him do the repair. This will accelerate my plans for starting work on the car. I sandblasted the wheels this weekend, and will paint them this week so I can get the car on wheels and off to the shop after our Thanksgiving holiday.
 
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  #22  
Old 11-30-2015, 10:33 AM
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Taking the car in for a little metal work today.As you can see the front end is a little banged up, and I have just the guy for the job. However, before I took it in, I had to get all the lights and other ancillary items removed.The aftermarket airconditioning presented the biggest challenge. Turns out, there was a small radiator in the left front wheel well that had to be removed in addition to all the air condition hoses and evaporator.There were also two condensers-one laying horizontal under the grill and radiator, and another large vertical one between the grill and radiator. It almost seemed like there were two different AC systems used in the past, andthey had left one when installing the new one. I think I am just going to start from scratch with a new system from RetroAir when the time comes. Iílldecide on what to do with the existing radiator at that point, as I suspect Iwill have to upgrade it.
Taking the lights and associated wiring harnesses out was fun- I did finally find the wiring connector blocks in the engine compartment. Mine are of course in terrible shape, and will have to be replaced. I am trying to be careful with tagging wires, but having a good wiring diagram will be key to re-assembly!
Before I could get the car off the blocks, I sandblasted, primed and painted the wheels. I got aquart of Old English White in single stage Urethane and it is a nice match.The wheels look great now, and they help motivate me to get the body work going.
 
Attached Thumbnails 67 MK 2 restoration-wheels.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-aux-rad.jpg  
  #23  
Old 11-30-2015, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by csbush View Post
Taking the lights and associated wiring harnesses out was fun- I did finally find the wiring connector blocks in the engine compartment.
I found my connector blocks for the lights had turned to licorice!

Good to see your progress - The OEW is a lovely color.
 
  #24  
Old 12-01-2015, 07:40 AM
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[QUOTE=redtriangle;1356787]I found my connector blocks for the lights had turned to licorice!QUOTE]

Yes, that is a perfect description for them.
 
  #25  
Old 12-07-2015, 01:55 PM
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Couple more pictures and a question-


The front was pretty crushed as you can see. Went by the body shop, and it is really shaping up.


The last picture is of the bracket used to hold the AC condenser. You can see where they bolt to the body on the bottom, and on the top, they bolt to the hood release cable retainer bolts. Brackets are about 13 inches apart. The condenser is a little smaller than the radiator, and was mounted to the front of these brackets between the grill and the radiator.


The question is related to model year. I am still waiting to get the paperwork on the cars, so I am not sure what they are. I was told they were 67 model year, but according to the chart on Valvechatter, the one with chassis number P213556DN (pictured below) is actually a 1959 model year! Is that correct?
Thanks!
 
Attached Thumbnails 67 MK 2 restoration-fender1.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-fender2.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-ac-bracket.jpg  
  #26  
Old 12-15-2015, 01:06 PM
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The Mark 2 was announced in 1959, so your car would be one of the first, if the Valvechatter chart is correct. Early cars had recessed sun shades, has yours ?
 
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  #27  
Old 12-15-2015, 01:12 PM
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yes, it does have the recessed sun shades. I have sent off to get a Heritage certificate on the car, so hopefully I will find out pretty soon.
In the meantime the body work is coming along, and I am working on refinishing the wood.
 
  #28  
Old 12-17-2015, 03:55 PM
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Wood work is coming along. It is a slow process- lots of pieces and each piece takes many coats of finish. I am using a spray high gloss polyurethane for ease of use and durability. The wood was in very bad condition, and needs all new veneer. The good news is that is was so bad that the old veneer scrapes right off. I did find a good source for supplies after searching this website, and found some nice Walnut Burl veneer from Veneersupplies.com, as well as the supplies to work with it. I decided to go with a heat-lock veneer glue that goes on like contact cement, then you use a heating element like an iron to attach it. It has worked very well, surpassing my expectations. One picture below shows a door piece with the glue on both sides, waiting attachment.
The other challenge I faced is that the wood pieces made from multiple pieces of wood like the dash and instrument cluster had come apart as the old wood glue failed. The dash is two pieces, so I sanded and re-glued it. The instrument cluster was also in five pieces, one of which was so rotted, I had to make a new piece. The picture below shows it all back together, waiting for veneer. The last picture shows the first two pieces that I have re-veneered, and started refinishing. This is with about four coats of finish, and I will keep spraying/sanding, spraying/sanding until I am happy with the luster. I have about 8 pieces in the finishing process now, and will post some more pictures as I get them. My final big project is the glove box which will take even more effort and new pieces than the instrument panel.
 
Attached Thumbnails 67 MK 2 restoration-wood3.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-wood1.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-wood2.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-wood4.jpg  
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  #29  
Old 12-18-2015, 06:07 AM
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Congrats for taking on such a challenging task. I notice your'e not doing any edge banding on the door pillar pieces. This is the part of the job that worries me, getting the right color and completing the trimming process.

Did you use any stain before applying the polyurethane finish?
 
  #30  
Old 12-18-2015, 07:14 AM
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I did not do edge banding on the door pillar pieces because they did not have it on the pieces I pulled off, and the finished wood is beautiful. Same with the pieces that go along the sides above the windows. I am somewhat limited because of previous work- I don't know what it was really supposed to look like in the first place. I have noticed on some pieces that there are multiple layers of veneer. For example on the glove box, there is a lighter colored layer, with the walnut veneer covering all of it but the edges. From pictures I have seen, the dash was done that way also. I just don't have the knowledge or skill to recreate that. I have put veneer back on all parts that had or seemed to have had veneer.


For wood or edges that do not get a veneer, I stain them first with a dark Walnut stain. I do not stain the veneer, as it is already very dark. The attached picture shows the latest progress, with some veneered and just stained pieces.
 
Attached Thumbnails 67 MK 2 restoration-wood5.jpg  
  #31  
Old 12-18-2015, 11:21 PM
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Looks like your wood is coming along and looking quite promising, but even though you didn't ask for help and you may be heading in the right direction, I am going to give you a few pointers.
When applying the type of glue that you used it is important that it goes on as even as possible.
This is to prevent ripples in the veneer that can be seen when the wood gets near completion.
The heat of the iron will help to get rid of these uneven layers of glue, but they will remain to some degree.
The veneer from Veneersupplies.com is quite thick and can stand to be "blocked", (sanded)

It looks like you have applied a few coats of your finish already, so at this point I would advise to let that cure for at least a week in a very dry and warm area.
After that, "block" it down with 400 grit paper, if you go courser then this, the sand paper scratches have a tenancy to show up.
The idea is to fill the grain with finish to achieve a mirror end result.

I found the quickest way to do this is to sand it back pretty much to bare wood, leaving only the finish in the lower pores of the wood.
Don't over do this process, you want to leave enough finish behind so the grain is filled.
Apply another coat of finish and leave it cure for at least 4 days _ lightly and evenly sand and apply another coat.
Take it back to bare wood again leaving finish in the grain.

Continue this process until the grain has been filled.
This takes while, but patients yields professional results.
Once the grain has been filled, top coats can be applied, leaving plenty of time for curing in between coats.
If the curing process is not done correctly, the finish will continue to cure, sinking into the grain and your mirror finish will be lost _ this can happen months after the wood is completed.

After applying more and more top coats and sanding with progressively finer grits (up to 2000 grit), I use this product to achieve the desired mirror finish.

3M 05928 Finesse-It II Machine Polish - 1 Quart, Body Repair Tools - Amazon Canada 3M 05928 Finesse-It II Machine Polish - 1 Quart, Body Repair Tools - Amazon Canada


I use a clear coat meant for cars, it has catalyst in it that speeds up the drying time and the whole process goes much quicker, but even then I still allow a month for it to cure before I start applying the finishing top coats.
Clear coats have to be sprayed on with a gun of some sort _ I use an air brush.

Are you using a brush to apply your coats or spray balms ?

If you want more advice, you may answer this question.
 

Last edited by JeffR1; 12-18-2015 at 11:36 PM.
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  #32  
Old 12-20-2015, 09:43 AM
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Thanks Jeff- all very helpful advice. I guess I was rushing it a bit with the finish. I was doing the sanding between coats, but could take it down a little more- and wait much longer between coats. I should not be in a hurry as I am still years away from finishing the car, so guess I can be patient!
For the finish, I am using a spray (rattle can) of Spar Urethane. I have used the same finish with a brush- but have been happier with the spray can so far.
When I get to the final coats, I will try the finer grit sandpaper and machine polish. I use that technique on auto finished, I'll see how it works on the Spar Urethane.
I am still doing a lot of wood work replacing parts of the glove box assembly, and will post pictures as that comes along.

On another front, I received some information back from Jaguar on the cars. I had some idea from Lin's VIN chart what model year cars I had, but now I know for sure- the 3.8 is a 1960 model, made in July 1960, and delivered to New York, and the 3.4 is a 1967 model, built in Dec 66, and delivered as a 67 model to Indiana.
 
  #33  
Old 12-20-2015, 02:37 PM
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Spray cans are fine or if you want to brush it it on, an artists "Mop" brush works well.

Silver Brush Silver Mop Brushes - Rex Art Supplies

The 1 inch one at the bottom.
Brushes from the hardware store are too coarse/cheap and loose too many bristles.
They leave brush marks behind and because they are so big, it's impossible to get an even coat with out runs and sags.
Any of these plastic air dry finishes have a tendency to run and sag too, even if they are sprayed on.
A good brush is paramount.

If you've polished car paint using polishing compound, that will also work with these types of spray/brush on finishes, but they need a longer curing time to harden up.
I've used Varathane with a brush and the compound that I mentioned earlier with very good results _ sanding in-between coats.
This is what I used to do until I started using clear-coat.
The other problem that you will face is that because these are air dry products are generally softer, they have a tendency to clog the sand paper, even when used wet. It takes a lighter touch and a watchful eye that your not cutting the finish with clogged paper. The bits that build up in the paper will mar the finish _ something to watch out for.

I've also experimented with simple marine varnish with good results, but the build quality of that stuff is dreadful. It took coat after coat to fill the grain and took way too long to cure _ we're talking weeks or even a number of months.
The stuff has linseed oil in it, which dries very slow and is too soft to polish really.

All this may seem a bit over the top, but try and shoot for perfection in what ever your method is.
There is nothing that looks worse then a "handy-man" or a rushed job where corners have been cut.
 

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  #34  
Old 12-20-2015, 07:31 PM
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Thanks- I'll keep after it


In the meantime, some of the metal work is progressing. All done with panel beating and a little lead. The gentleman doing this work for me is truly amazing!
 
Attached Thumbnails 67 MK 2 restoration-bodywork.jpg  
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Last edited by csbush; 12-21-2015 at 04:39 PM.
  #35  
Old 12-24-2015, 11:37 PM
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We should not confuse "build date/Model Year) and registration date for cars sold in the US at that time. My car (1960 3.8 Mk2) has chassis number 210883 and was built on December 23rd, 1959 (and it's a 1960 model) and was registered in CA in February 1960. At that time, Model year in Europe started in October (it starts now in July), so a car build after October 1959 was a 1960 "Model".
Chassis 213556 is probably a 1960 build number and, if it was sold in 1960, a 1960 model and registration too. The recessed sun shades is typical of a 1960 model.
There was no 1959 Mk2 Model year (although in the States a 1960 model sold before January 1st, 1960 would be registered as a 1959). The Mk2 was presented in 1959 as a 1960 model. I think your Heritage Certificate will confirm this.
JP
 

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  #36  
Old 01-12-2016, 12:39 PM
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Making a little progress. I know these are little things given what lies ahead, but I amdetermined to enjoy the process, and as I have mentioned before, I am in nohurry.The 1960 car is finishing up inthe body shop.I got a new/ refurbishedgrill from SNG Barratt, so as they finish up the front end metal work they havea good template to work from.
Once I get the car back, I am going to trying a differentstrategy for this restoration. Insteadof pulling everything off, finishing the body, and then restoring parts as Iput the car back together, I am going to try restoring parts as I pull themoff.I tend to get impatient with thefinal assembly, and this way, I will be more attentive to the bits and piecesas they are restored.Any thoughts orsuggestions on this strategy?How do youtackle a complete rebuild?
As to the little pieces, I took the advice of Jeff andslowed way down on the wood refinishing. I did finish all the veneering, and all the parts are in the process ofapplying the finish.I spray on a coat,wait a week for it to harden, and then sand and repeat the process.
The other project was the glove box. It was stained and worn smooth on the inside.The soft velvety inside is fromflocking.I had heard about this processbefore, but never actually done it.Flocking comes in different colors, and the glue used to attach the fibersis colored to match.The processinvolves sanding off the old flocking, applying the adhesive with a brush andusing the supplied applicator to blow the flocking onto the glue.Color choices are somewhat limited so I hadto go with a little darker grey than I would have liked, but it came out reallynice.
When I get the car back, one of the things I want to startwith is repairing the doors. Any tips onhow to re-skin a door, or is it just better to cut off the rust bottom thirdand weld in a replacement piece?Eitherway, I would probably buy a replacement door skin so I had the right metal inthe right shape.
 
Attached Thumbnails 67 MK 2 restoration-wood4.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-box3.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-box2.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-box1.jpg  
  #37  
Old 01-13-2016, 04:09 AM
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I am impressed with your wood. Also the glove box. Excellent work!

You have inspired me to have a go at mine. Realistically, I have little choice other than DIY, as I'm fast running out of money! Too many unexpected expenses, and with most restorations, the standards you set for yourself keep increasing.

I find it takes some discipline to restore parts as you remove them. The temptation to completely strip a car first up is too great. But there is no doubt it hastens the re-assembly process. Also allows you to plan ahead so fewer delays when you're progressing. Not that I would really know, my project has been a litany of errors, many things being done twice due to inexperience.

I did not re-skin my doors. I was worried that the shut-lines would change too much and cause more work. I guess it depends on how bad your doors are, but with mine the rust was worse at the bottoms of the doors than the skins themselves, which I managed to patch up and finish off with filler. This was a lot of work also, so I suppose its a case of six of one & half a dozen of the other!.
 
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  #38  
Old 01-27-2016, 04:23 PM
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Got the car back from the shop with the repaired front end,so now it is home, and I can start the dis-assembly. The other and most important factor is thatwe are now actually the legal owner of the cars.Specifically, legal ownership means a cleantitle.I didnít think it would be a hugeproblem, but you never know until you have the paperwork in hand.In our case, we had to take the paperwork tothe San Antonio Police department who did an investigation, talked to theprevious owners, and in general, made sure the cars were not stolen.Then with all the paperwork and pictures, wehad to go before a judge to have the cars officially transferred to us.The judge looked at the pictures and asked uswhat we planned on doing with the cars.When we told him we were going to restore them,fortunately he approved the transfer, and didnot declare us mentally incompetent.Thecars do attract a lot of interest.Thedetective who handled our case asked if we would provide him updates of therestoration.As a result of theinvestigation, I did find out a little more about the cars.The 1960 MK2 that was delivered to New Yorkeventually found its way to Texas.Itwas had been previously titled in Texas as a 1961 model, even though it wasbuilt and delivered in July 1960.Withthe certificate from JCNA, we were able to prove its year, and title it as a1960 model.The other car, a 1967 3.4,which was originally delivered to Indiana, somehow found its way toCalifornia.From there, it was bought onE-Bay, and has spent the last 10 years in storage here in Texas.Still on the fence about restoring the67.Will use some parts off of it forthe 1960, and then when that is done, see how motivated we are to restoreit.Now off to the fun part-disassembly!



 

Last edited by csbush; 01-27-2016 at 04:25 PM.
  #39  
Old 02-08-2016, 02:09 PM
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Working on rebuilding the carbs and polishing associated parts. Carbs were a mess. Amazing what soaking in carburetor cleaner for 24 hours will do.


Here are some before and after pictures. Still working on one carb. Hoping I can get some stripped screws out of the throttle valve shafts, so I can get the butterfly off and remove the shaft. The seals on the other shaft disintegrated into little pieces when I removed them.


Two questions-


1. What is the size of the bolt head that holds the damper to the crankshaft? I have a 1 5/16 socket which seemed to fit, it just slipped on the nut. I thought I tried 1 1/4 and it was too small, but perhaps I didn't try hard enough to get it on...


2. What is the general consensus on the enrichment carburetors? Neither car I have had the wiring to make these function. I figured out how to wire them in, but it seems odd that the wiring was missing in both cars.
 
Attached Thumbnails 67 MK 2 restoration-carb1.jpg   67 MK 2 restoration-carb2.jpg  
  #40  
Old 02-10-2016, 07:40 AM
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I figured out the size of the damper nut. It is 1 5/16 inch. The problem I was having is when I would put the socket on the nut to turn it, it felt like the socket was slipping on the nut. I finally put a little sticker on the nut, tried it, and realized it was the nut turning. The nut has a little metal piece behind it that makes a little click when turning the nut, that made it seem like the socket was slipping. The nut was actually loose. I was expecting to have to put some pressure on it to turn it, and didn't.
 

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