XJ6 & XJ12 Series I, II & III 1968-1992

Question for the v8 conversions

 
  #21  
Old 05-20-2017, 12:04 PM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Austin tx and Daytona FL.
Posts: 6,605
Received 903 Likes on 693 Posts
Default

i use a custom Aluminum driveshaft, HD GM U joints, 700 trans, GM diff yoke at pinion shaft!

works great NO vibes ,and saves weight!
 
Attached Thumbnails Question for the v8 conversions-jag-under-shaft-trans-010.jpg   Question for the v8 conversions-jag-under-shaft-trans-005.jpg  
  #22  
Old 05-20-2017, 01:36 PM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Tehama County, California, USA
Posts: 17,167
Received 3,471 Likes on 2,708 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Mad Hatter View Post
I sorted all the wiring a few months back, was just the only picture I had on my computer with me at the time :P

The odd box with the chalk mark is a charcoal canister for the fuel tanks. Do others series 2 cars not have this? Maybe it was done during my poor v8 conversion.
Nix has that canister but it's pretty worthless, not even completely connected. Mostly its purpose is to satisfy the SMOG cops.

You might not even need it in your area.
(';')
 
  #23  
Old 05-20-2017, 02:51 PM
Mad Hatter's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Springfield, IL
Posts: 98
Received 13 Likes on 13 Posts
Default

Yeah @lnrb I live in an area with no emissions requirements but that doesnt mean that i will forever! I wonder if they would even care in CA though as it is a 74 model year.
 
  #24  
Old 05-20-2017, 03:46 PM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Tehama County, California, USA
Posts: 17,167
Received 3,471 Likes on 2,708 Posts
Default

Not 1974. The cutoff year is 1975. If your car has a build date of January 1976 like mine does then they Most Certainly Do Care!

As California has among the most stringent emissions rules in the country, I'd say your quite safe.
(';')
 
  #25  
Old 05-21-2017, 08:31 AM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Walnut Creek, California
Posts: 5,730
Received 1,945 Likes on 1,569 Posts
Default

Indeed, the canister and it's related components are for SMOG purposes. Mine is connected. But, I doubt it's effectiveness. It is intended to deliver fumes from the gas tank to the engine for combustion rather than the old tech way of venting them to the atmosphere. But, in my car, the filler cap seals are pretty raggedy and I doubt they seal... Why it passes CA's tank test, befuddles me.


OTH, My Jeep flunked the EVAP test. OK on the combustion stuff. Failed seal on the filler cap. Offered a replacement at $12 or go get my own. "DEAL" an easy decision.


Carl
 
  #26  
Old 05-21-2017, 09:22 AM
Senior Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 151
Received 45 Likes on 31 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by sunchip View Post
could you post some pictures of it? and how much would you want for it?
$100, or the same for an original hood. Thanks, Rob
 
Attached Thumbnails Question for the v8 conversions-xjs-hoods-002.jpg  
  #27  
Old 05-21-2017, 09:27 AM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Pacific Northwest USA
Posts: 20,147
Received 6,547 Likes on 4,859 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by JagCad View Post

My lumped 83 has a one piece line and seems fine to me. Ron probably has far better ears than mine.


Carl

We all have different sensitivities to NVH.

I've driven scores of RWD cars with a one piece driveshaft and never felt (literally or figuratively) that there was an inherent vibration problem. OTOH, a very comment remark from passengers after riding in a Jag for the first time is "Oh my god, this this car is so smooth"

Ages ago a lot of USA luxury cars used 2-piece drive shafts. Perhaps not to correct a problem but, instead, to achieve that extra bit of refinement? Some of the Buicks (and probably others) had not merely two-piece shaft but a *double* u-joint affair joining the two halves. The name of the design escapes me at the moment. But I remember that Dad, who was "A Buick Man", used to curse the design as they didn't hold up very well and were expensive to replace. This was 1960s-1970s.

(Back in the day it was common to be "A Chevrolet Man", or "A Ford Man", or even "A Jag Man". But that's a stroll down a different memory lane)

I also remember, from decades ago, that many full sized Ford products often had giant weights attached to the differential to dampen vibrations. Crude but effective?

Ramble switch "off" for now :-)

Cheers
DD
 
  #28  
Old 05-21-2017, 09:31 AM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Pacific Northwest USA
Posts: 20,147
Received 6,547 Likes on 4,859 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by JagCad View Post
Indeed, the canister and it's related components are for SMOG purposes. Mine is connected. But, I doubt it's effectiveness.

Heh heh.

It's like a great many emissions control devices. Worked effectively....while it was still working. Nothing lasts forever.


Cheers
DD
 
  #29  
Old 05-21-2017, 09:49 AM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: New York City
Posts: 1,704
Received 857 Likes on 554 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Doug View Post
a very comment remark from passengers after riding in a Jag for the first time is "Oh my god, this this car is so smooth"
I hear that too, even though my jag is heavily skewed towards performance.


Originally Posted by Doug View Post
Ages ago a lot of USA luxury cars used 2-piece drive shafts. Perhaps not to correct a problem but, instead, to achieve that extra bit of refinement? Some of the Buicks (and probably others) had not merely two-piece shaft but a *double* u-joint affair joining the two halves. The name of the design escapes me at the moment.
It was called a double carden joint. My 1978 Cadillac Seville had one. The seville was one of my favorite cars...I guess its no accident the design borrows heavily from the Jag sedans that preceded it.

No comparison between the Seville and the Jag mechanically though. The Seville didn't have a rack and pinion but a rather sloppy stearing box and no interdependent rear suspension, it had truck like lief springs.



Understanding Universal Joints and Size Charts







seville driveshaft with double carden joint
 
The following users liked this post:
Doug (05-21-2017)
  #30  
Old 05-21-2017, 09:49 AM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Walnut Creek, California
Posts: 5,730
Received 1,945 Likes on 1,569 Posts
Default

Doug:


Yes, that memory thing. The double U joint is AKA constant velocity joint. YUP, used amidship in USA critters.


And in the fabulous 36/37 FWD Cords. RZEPA brand. Rumoured to have been a source of trouble.


I'm a bit fuzzy on the theory, but it seems that as the angle of installation of a conventional U joint increased, that the rotational speed of each trunion varied as it turned. Result, a bit of a whip saw motion that translated in to vibration.


And as you say, sensitivities varied.


Ford also used a "pipe within a pipe" member for a drive shaft. The pipes interconnected with a ruberoid layer. Object. Smooth power transmission.


And Ford incorporated "Torque boxes" in strategic locations in it's Unibodied big cars
for the ultimate smooth ride.


Oh, one more, a pipe within a pipe for Lincoln exhaust pipes. Oh, oh, the inner pipe could collapse and drive folks "nuts" as to why the beautiful Lincoln would barely run if at all.


I do have new seals for the Jag filler caps. Far down on the "task list". If it flunks that test next time around, I may install them. It might be wiser to do a preemptive fix !


Band saw to fix in a bit. Then hibernate, heat on the way.....
Carl
 
The following users liked this post:
ronbros (05-21-2017)
  #31  
Old 05-21-2017, 09:53 AM
Senior Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 151
Received 45 Likes on 31 Posts
Default

I guess I messed up. Here goes again.

$100 for the hood, or for an original one.

Rob
 
Attached Thumbnails Question for the v8 conversions-xjs-hoods-001.jpg   Question for the v8 conversions-xjs-hoods-002.jpg  
  #32  
Old 05-21-2017, 10:11 AM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: New York City
Posts: 1,704
Received 857 Likes on 554 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by JagCad View Post
Doug:


I'm a bit fuzzy on the theory, but it seems that as the angle of installation of a conventional U joint increased, that the rotational speed of each trunion varied as it turned. Result, a bit of a whip saw motion that translated in to vibration.
So the way it works is...

- with a single u-jount...as the it turns, it will shorten and lengthen in
perportion to the angle of the joint.

- with a double joint , the shortening and lenghteing is offset by the double joint's 180 degree offset. As one shortens the other lengthens thus effectively offsetting the vibration or movement in the shaft.
 
  #33  
Old 05-21-2017, 12:41 PM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Walnut Creek, California
Posts: 5,730
Received 1,945 Likes on 1,569 Posts
Default

Got it. thanks.


Good day in the shop this AM.


1. fixed the band saw. It merely tossed a blade, not busted it. Mea culpa. Wacky feed of a tree limb.


2. Fired up the Jeep to see if it's AC needed a charge. First effort said yes. Cool for a bit, then warm!!! Forgot about the compressor on/off button. sure enough, it was in the "off" position. Engaged, cool air and stayed that way. Rough test. Hold finger tip to outlet. A bit of a bite means OK to cool.


3. My solar topped marker along my drive used to back the Jeep in and leave maximum room on the other side gone??? Made an "elegant" post from a limb from the tree, I severely pruned. Chop saw to make point on one end. Sharp hand saw to clean nubs. Spade bit in old hand drill to bore a hole in tne other. Post of solar lamp fits there. Used big bolt in the bore and a BFH to drive it in toe still somewhat moist soil.


Done, in, t is getting hot. 70 F in my cool breezeway. Away, 80F + and climbing....


Carl
 
  #34  
Old 05-21-2017, 12:57 PM
Senior Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Hamilton ON Canada
Posts: 347
Received 44 Likes on 36 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Robert Laughton View Post
I guess I messed up. Here goes again.

$100 for the hood, or for an original one.

Rob
that looks good only problem its an xjs and i need one from an xj6/12, let me know if you have a hood from one of those and ill probably pick it up when im back from europe
 
  #35  
Old 05-22-2017, 07:22 AM
Senior Member
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 151
Received 45 Likes on 31 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by sunchip View Post
that looks good only problem its an xjs and i need one from an xj6/12, let me know if you have a hood from one of those and ill probably pick it up when im back from europe
Yes I do. Thanks, Rob
 
  #36  
Old 05-22-2017, 03:28 PM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Austin tx and Daytona FL.
Posts: 6,605
Received 903 Likes on 693 Posts
Default

seein how this driveshaft/u-joint BS has been beat to death!

i just was reading that for serious performance for the Mustang S197 models,

you have to do away with the 2 piece driveshaft, some of them have been breaking off under hard loads!

they recommend a single piece shaft made from Aluminum along with Heavy Duty U-joints! or a carbon fiber shaft(if you can afford it!).
 
The following users liked this post:
Roger Mabry (05-22-2017)
  #37  
Old 05-22-2017, 07:37 PM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: New York City
Posts: 1,704
Received 857 Likes on 554 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by ronbros View Post
seein how this driveshaft/u-joint BS has been beat to death!

i just was reading that for serious performance for the Mustang S197 models,

you have to do away with the 2 piece driveshaft, some of them have been breaking off under hard loads!

they recommend a single piece shaft made from Aluminum along with Heavy Duty U-joints! or a carbon fiber shaft(if you can afford it!).
This is becasue the S197 from the factory came with a very thin shaft with a smallish CV joint in the middle so in this case and the small tunnel of the S197 and thin wallets of the owners leave them little choice. My guess is they dont care about vibration either. My googleage suggests some of these cars are modded but the boy racer crowd and shaft breakage is quite common. This is a prime example why I'm a GM guy.


Conversely, the Dodge Demon, a factory 9 second car that launches so hard that it pulls it's front wheels off the ground... it uses a.... 2 piece shaft.

The Dodge Demon's (Drive)line of Defense - Hot Rod Network

Many many many high HP NHRA cars us two piece shafts too. They're sanctioned and some racers believe they are safer and offer an slight advantage. Vibration is lost power to the wheels. Any serious racer understands the advantages. The drive line bloke who want you paid and gone will force a once piece on you becasue its a quick buck. A two piece requires more precision. A one piece can be off by an inch either way and still work.
https://dragillustrated.com/lueck-ra...aft-enclosure/

Frankly anyone doing a convert can use a two piece simply becasue replacing just the front half of the shaft is much cheaper and preserves the XJ refinement we all appreciate. And since converts usually use use a slip yoke it can still be off by an inch or so and still work fine.
 

Last edited by icsamerica; 05-22-2017 at 08:00 PM.
  #38  
Old 05-23-2017, 07:04 PM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Austin tx and Daytona FL.
Posts: 6,605
Received 903 Likes on 693 Posts
Default

all i'm sure of is mine works fine ,and no problems in 22 yrs!

KISS(keep it simple stupid).
 
The following users liked this post:
Roger Mabry (05-23-2017)
  #39  
Old 06-21-2019, 10:29 PM
LT1 jaguar's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Wasilla,Alaska
Posts: 77
Received 18 Likes on 13 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by icsamerica View Post
This is becasue the S197 from the factory came with a very thin shaft with a smallish CV joint in the middle so in this case and the small tunnel of the S197 and thin wallets of the owners leave them little choice. My guess is they dont care about vibration either. My googleage suggests some of these cars are modded but the boy racer crowd and shaft breakage is quite common. This is a prime example why I'm a GM guy.


Conversely, the Dodge Demon, a factory 9 second car that launches so hard that it pulls it's front wheels off the ground... it uses a.... 2 piece shaft.

The Dodge Demon's (Drive)line of Defense - Hot Rod Network

Many many many high HP NHRA cars us two piece shafts too. They're sanctioned and some racers believe they are safer and offer an slight advantage. Vibration is lost power to the wheels. Any serious racer understands the advantages. The drive line bloke who want you paid and gone will force a once piece on you becasue its a quick buck. A two piece requires more precision. A one piece can be off by an inch either way and still work.
https://dragillustrated.com/lueck-ra...aft-enclosure/

Frankly anyone doing a convert can use a two piece simply becasue replacing just the front half of the shaft is much cheaper and preserves the XJ refinement we all appreciate. And since converts usually use use a slip yoke it can still be off by an inch or so and still work fine.
Thinking ahead on my 1985 S3 lump, the drive shaft issue came to mind and I found this old thread that makes me think the stock shaft that came with the car will be OK. Of course there is always a question-what are your thoughts on the rubber isolator connecting two pieces of one of the shafts? Is there an inherent weakness with 300-350hp. I can see where that design could be potentially smoother.
Dave
 
 

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: