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New Project: Tensioners

 
  #21  
Old 03-12-2019, 11:45 AM
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This morning I completed disassembly. The left primary chain would not slip over the VVT unit sprocket, so I took care of that as the VVT unit was coming off. See below.

The left primary chain would not slip over the VVT unit so I left that until the VVT was being removed.

Another view of the left primary chain not sliding over the VVT unit.

Left secondary chain and VVT unit removed. Tensioner still installed.

Right bank, secondary chain and VVT unit removed. The vertical black bar is the camshaft locking tool.

Front ends of the right bank cams, exhaust on left, intake on right.
 

Last edited by stu46h; 03-12-2019 at 11:52 AM.
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  #22  
Old 03-12-2019, 11:50 AM
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Cracked guide from the left bank.

Cracked guide from the right bank.

All that work for this.

Inventory time.
Two guides were cracked and that's all so I don't have any problems to remedy.
I laid all the parts out for organization, to inventory the new parts, and reference during reassembly.
 
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  #23  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:35 PM
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All was going so well.
I installed the secondary and primary timing chains, guides, and tensioners and it was turning out well. Then Murphy showed up. The tool (from the kit) that inserts into the VVT oil control unit was too large (diameter) and would not fit into the recess in the VVT unit. It was close, but it was too big. I'm not a machinist by any means, so I used what I had to shave a little material off. It worked. The tool slid into the VVT unit, but the pins on the tool that are supposed to engage holes in the VVT did not.
Otherwise, the installation of the chains, tensioners, and guides went very well. While everything was removed, I did a little cleaning.

Use Scotchbrite and alcohol to clean the timing cover mating surface. The top part is cleaned, the bottom section had not yet been cleaned.

New primary chain on the right bank.

New primary chains, tensioners, and guides.

New secondary chain and tensioner on the right bank.

New primary chain on the left bank. You can see the nut at the top on a stud. This mounts the guide, and the nut mounts the VVT bracket.

This is where Murphy arrived and the VVT control unit tool would not fit.
 

Last edited by stu46h; 03-12-2019 at 06:58 PM.
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  #24  
Old 03-12-2019, 06:56 PM
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Things to watch for when you change the timing chains:
1-Make sure the VVT oil control unit tool fits into the hole and the pins on the tool engage the holes in the VVT oil control unit.
2-Make sure you install the tension side primary chain guides before installing the primary chains, or you'll have to remove the tensioner to slacken the chain to get the guide on. Guess how I know. I couldn't find this step in the directions.
3-When you place the tool on the exhaust cam sprocket prior to installation of the primary chain, a "convenient" position for the tool is one that allows you to put tension on the tool in a counterclockwise direction as you torque the exhaust cam bolt. The square cutout in the exhaust cam sprocket tool is for a half inch drive breaker bar. You'll need it. Try to keep the square hole in the tool away from the secondary chain tensioner to allow better engagement of the breaker bar.
4-The intake and exhaust cams are not keyed for the sprockets. Torque is very important on those bolts.
5-When installing the primary chains, I slipped the crankshaft sprocket off, engaged the chain, then reinstalled the sprocket. It was easier to get the tension side tighter this way.
Note: The crankshaft sprockets are keyed.
I almost got the timing chain installation complete. I'm very happy with my progress so far. Everything is going together well.
I just need to get my hands on a tool that fits the VVT oil control unit and I'll be moving forward again.
Also, I did see some cracking in the old tensioners but they weren't coming apart yet.
 

Last edited by stu46h; 03-12-2019 at 07:04 PM.
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  #25  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:52 PM
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Great thread. Many thanks for the write up. Pictures are good too.
Will be doing this job in the future and the little things you’ve noticed make all the difference in the job.
Your planning was great... but the VVT body tool not fitting....Murthy’s Law indeed.
 
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Old 03-13-2019, 07:41 AM
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agree with David - excellent write up and pics. Thanks for taking the time to document the job
 
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Old 03-13-2019, 06:54 PM
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No problem, guys. My pleasure.
I get a lot out of this forum so I figured this was a good way to give back.
I'll be posting more once I get a tool for the VVT unit and resume progress.
 
  #28  
Old 03-14-2019, 08:38 PM
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What's wrong with this picture?


Since I'm waiting for a new VVT unit tool, I did some cleaning and inspecting. I found something that I needed to fix.
If you look at the primary chain where it meets the upper guide you can see a gap between the two. The chain is not laying flat on the guide because it is sitting on the rear shoulder of the guide and hanging halfway off the guide on the back side. It's even worse toward the crankshaft gear. You can't see that part, but with my hand I could feel it. What happened is that I installed the guide and tensioner after the chain was on but didn't check the alignment of the chain and guide. I don't know if the chain would have found its way to lay properly on the guide, or if it bad things would have happened. I'm glad I took the time to look.
This was easy to fix. I just removed the primary tensioner, repositioned the guide, and reinstalled the tensioner. It took 15 minutes.
FYI, the stud with the nut on it above the gap mentioned is one of the mounts for the VVT unit bracket.
So, when you think you are done installing the chains, guides, and tensioners, take a break and come back and look at everything. Take a little time to admire your work. It sounds silly, but taking a break is important here. Even wait until the next day. Clear your mind and eyes.
Make sure everything is perfect before you close it up. Do not rush this part. A half hour spent here is well worth it. Things are easy to remedy now. When you are installing the timing cover, you don't want any second thoughts about anything underneath. Everything has to be perfect.
I'm not crazy, I just spent a career in aircraft maintenance.
 
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  #29  
Old 03-15-2019, 03:55 AM
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Astonishingly clean motor. Can you elaborate again on mileage, type of oil, brand, filter change duration, etc?

keep on keeping on.

ltd
 
  #30  
Old 03-17-2019, 09:29 AM
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Thanks.
Nothing spectacular going on here.
I bought the car in 2005 with 18,000 miles on it. I'm at 103,000 miles now.
Regular oil changes in the 3,000 to 5,000 mile range. Filters are usually Fram. Oil is usually Quaker State.
Those brands can vary based on prices at Walmart or Rock Auto but I always buy a major brand. No generic stuff.
I document everything done on the car, and I do almost everything myself, so I am religious about timely oil changes.
No Jiffy Lube for me.
 

Last edited by stu46h; 03-17-2019 at 09:44 AM.
 
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