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Milky appearance on wood trim 2001 xjr

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Milky appearance on wood trim 2001 xjr

 
  #1  
Old 10-24-2010, 02:56 AM
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Default Milky appearance on wood trim 2001 xjr

I am new tothe forum so please excuse me if this question was already addressed in another thread. I have a 2001 xjr with milky wood trim. Are there any remedies for this other than sanding and refinishing the trim? Thanks for the help
 
  #2  
Old 10-24-2010, 04:54 AM
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Welcome to the forum cdn. Hopefully someone will be able to help you. Also have a look through the detailing section.
 
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Old 10-24-2010, 09:51 AM
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They need to be refinished...and it is very difficult to DIY. This company has experience with this problem and has a good track record:

http://www.britishautowood.com/dashboard.html
 
  #4  
Old 10-24-2010, 11:03 AM
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This is a subject that has been talked about for many years and by many with a lot of opinions. I am not an expert in this area but have been fooling around with furniture making and finishing for years and have contemplated the process of refinishing the trim in the Jags. I am soon to retire and hope to begin doing this when I finish doing the other stuff..
Removing the trim is a big thing without damaging it in the process the next thing is to strip the old finish to expose the wood. In the process of doing this your wood will develop stains from the product you use. I know I jumped ahead without addressing the product used to strip the finish. I am at this time unable to identify the finish myself but from what I understand it is a commercial lacquer finish. The only thing that is telling me is that it is going to be hard to duplicate the finish but I would give it a try.
• Removing the finish
Assuming that it is lacquer I would find a product that will remove it. And take your time doing this! If you are thinking about sanding it off you need to know that you will be sanding into the wood in the process of removing the finish, a small but substantial portion of wood that is at times noticeable. I say this because you are going to use grits from 100, 220 to 400 and you will need to block it and that will take time.
• Removing the finish remover and stains
Yes chances you are going to have stains from the finish remover and you do not want that to be noticeable and it will be when you begin finishing. I am not recommending this product but you can use Behien De-Waxer to remove the stains that were left behind.
• Sanding
Sanding is important and should not be taken lightly. HaHa! Do not use a heavier grit sandpaper than necessary to achieve the finish quality you desire. When the sand paper begins to clog replace it without hesitation. Earlier I mentioned blocking, this process is often overlooked and it should not happen. You can use a stiff rubber block designed for this use, what it does is it eliminates divots in the wood that will wave at you after finishing. Be careful not to forget the soft roll in the wood at all ends. I hope that made sense!
• Wood Grain Filler
I know what is Wood Grain Filler? If used properly it will give you a level finish and that is what you are looking for. I am a Minwax stain user, I do not use the water based products but the stain can be used as filler but only as a last resort.
• Stains
Use a stain to create an even contrast in your finish or to match what you have not finished (not an easy task). If you remember anything on this post remember that your finished color/texture is identified when your filler/stain is applied and wet. When it dries it looks like just another piece of wood so keep an eye on it.
• Your finish
This is a process that is not as easy as it seems. I am a spray lacquer guy but you must have the right type of equipment to spray. You need a HVLP sprayer and a spray booth and you must use a respirator when spraying. Now if you do not have an option to spraying. Deft makes a self leveling lacquer finish in gloss, semi-gloss and satin and the best part is that it will dry in 30 min. Now when you apply this product you need to be in a ventilated area and use a quality brush and have lacquer cleaner/thinner on hand. Wait for at least 24 hours and block sand it again and do it until you reach the finish you want.

I failed to mention that with lacquer each coat that you put on the surface becomes one because of its chemical composition.

I should also say that if you use the Deft you MUST make sure it is stirred and when you think it is do it again and put the lid back on when done.

If you are not familiar with finishing you should try it on a scrap wood. You should also test the process to be sure that the materials YOU get are compatible with each other.


Caution; should you apply water to the wood prior to applying the finish you will be raising the grain and you may need to go back a few steps. The water could also create a stain and that means starting over again. I hope this helps!
 

Last edited by Gus; 10-24-2010 at 08:56 PM. Reason: added testing and compatibility
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Old 10-24-2010, 08:40 PM
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I'll be doing this (the above) for the most part once I can get some extra wood for my car to practice on.
 
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Old 10-25-2010, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Translator View Post
Welcome to the forum cdn. Hopefully someone will be able to help you. Also have a look through the detailing section.
Thanks Richard,

i will check out the rules. Great site!
 
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Old 10-28-2010, 12:01 AM
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Thanks Gus for the detailed response...very much appreciated. I thinkthis is the only way to go. My only worry is removing the panels from the car. i think this may be difficult and perhaps result in damage to the wood as well as the panel. Thank you for taking the time to respond.



Originally Posted by Gus View Post
This is a subject that has been talked about for many years and by many with a lot of opinions. I am not an expert in this area but have been fooling around with furniture making and finishing for years and have contemplated the process of refinishing the trim in the Jags. I am soon to retire and hope to begin doing this when I finish doing the other stuff..
Removing the trim is a big thing without damaging it in the process the next thing is to strip the old finish to expose the wood. In the process of doing this your wood will develop stains from the product you use. I know I jumped ahead without addressing the product used to strip the finish. I am at this time unable to identify the finish myself but from what I understand it is a commercial lacquer finish. The only thing that is telling me is that it is going to be hard to duplicate the finish but I would give it a try.
Removing the finish
Assuming that it is lacquer I would find a product that will remove it. And take your time doing this! If you are thinking about sanding it off you need to know that you will be sanding into the wood in the process of removing the finish, a small but substantial portion of wood that is at times noticeable. I say this because you are going to use grits from 100, 220 to 400 and you will need to block it and that will take time.
Removing the finish remover and stains
Yes chances you are going to have stains from the finish remover and you do not want that to be noticeable and it will be when you begin finishing. I am not recommending this product but you can use Behien De-Waxer to remove the stains that were left behind.
Sanding
Sanding is important and should not be taken lightly. HaHa! Do not use a heavier grit sandpaper than necessary to achieve the finish quality you desire. When the sand paper begins to clog replace it without hesitation. Earlier I mentioned blocking, this process is often overlooked and it should not happen. You can use a stiff rubber block designed for this use, what it does is it eliminates divots in the wood that will wave at you after finishing. Be careful not to forget the soft roll in the wood at all ends. I hope that made sense!
Wood Grain Filler
I know what is Wood Grain Filler? If used properly it will give you a level finish and that is what you are looking for. I am a Minwax stain user, I do not use the water based products but the stain can be used as filler but only as a last resort.
Stains
Use a stain to create an even contrast in your finish or to match what you have not finished (not an easy task). If you remember anything on this post remember that your finished color/texture is identified when your filler/stain is applied and wet. When it dries it looks like just another piece of wood so keep an eye on it.
Your finish
This is a process that is not as easy as it seems. I am a spray lacquer guy but you must have the right type of equipment to spray. You need a HVLP sprayer and a spray booth and you must use a respirator when spraying. Now if you do not have an option to spraying. Deft makes a self leveling lacquer finish in gloss, semi-gloss and satin and the best part is that it will dry in 30 min. Now when you apply this product you need to be in a ventilated area and use a quality brush and have lacquer cleaner/thinner on hand. Wait for at least 24 hours and block sand it again and do it until you reach the finish you want.

I failed to mention that with lacquer each coat that you put on the surface becomes one because of its chemical composition.

I should also say that if you use the Deft you MUST make sure it is stirred and when you think it is do it again and put the lid back on when done.

If you are not familiar with finishing you should try it on a scrap wood. You should also test the process to be sure that the materials YOU get are compatible with each other.


Caution; should you apply water to the wood prior to applying the finish you will be raising the grain and you may need to go back a few steps. The water could also create a stain and that means starting over again. I hope this helps!
 
  #8  
Old 10-28-2010, 08:34 AM
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Thanks for your response! Please let me know if I managed to miss anything.
 
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Old 10-30-2010, 09:19 AM
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I do not profess to be an expert in this by any means...but some cautions I would add are:

-The type of stripper and stripping time may be critical, as you do not want to delaminate the veneer when stripping.

-Sanding must be undertaken with the utmost of caution, since the finshed veneer layer is extremely thin.

-Here is an ebay link to an appropriate finish material: http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Wood-...Q5fAccessories
Note that it is a chemically catalized material with UV inhibitors.

I think its great if you want to undertake this yourself, but there is a lot of homework required on this job to get it right.
 
  #10  
Old 10-30-2010, 09:37 AM
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I am not sure but this looks like either industrial grade lacquer and spraying is the way to use this. When adding the catalyst the blend will dictate the set and hardening time and only mix what you need. Other cautions are use it in a well ventilated area and use a respirator and NO SMOKING!
 
  #11  
Old 11-04-2010, 09:54 AM
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https://www.jaguarforums.com/forum/s...ad.php?t=42730

Read this thread from the S type forum.
One of the guys did the same thing. He bought used wood from E bay and then sent it to a vendor here in the US. This looks like a good and reasonably priced way to go about this project. The vendors website is highlighted in the thread.
His removal and reinstall instructions have some good tips,that MIGHT apply to your Jag.
Good luck.
 
  #12  
Old 12-08-2018, 04:56 AM
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Default Milky Woodwork

My 2001 my XK8 has milky woodwork. I have dediced to DIY and this is my first attempt at restoring the gearnob. If anyone is interested I will post a more detailed reply.
 

Last edited by Domdelicato; 12-08-2018 at 05:09 AM.
 
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