XJ40 ( XJ81 ) 1986 - 1994

coil spring compressor

 
  #1  
Old 01-28-2017, 01:40 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ohio
Posts: 68
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
Default coil spring compressor

Hi everyone,

I'm due to rebuild the front suspension on my '92 xj6 sovereign. I cannot locate a spring compressor to rent or buy but have found all of the homemade versions that other owners have created. If I can avoid recreating the wheel, I would just rather rent/borrow one that already exists since I only plan to do this one time. If anyone has one available, please let me know.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 01-31-2017, 12:18 PM
jerry_hoback's Avatar
Veteran Member
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Michigan City, Indiana
Posts: 1,814
Received 374 Likes on 306 Posts
Default

I have to suggest that some threaded rod, a few washers and some nuts would probably be the simpler way than trying to find a proper one. I made one and had good luck.(by the way, I used a small jack under the arm as cheap insurance) The investment was under $50, by comparison to shipping a borrowed one or renting. Where in Ohio are you? Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 01-31-2017, 08:08 PM
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: The Beautiful Mid-South, U.S.A.
Posts: 16,600
Received 7,673 Likes on 4,280 Posts
Default

Hi dtrain,

I've been too busy to try to find the one I made and weigh it, but I suspect that Jerry is right about the cost of shipping it to you and back to me might exceed the cost of making one yourself. I'm also a bit concerned about legal liability should you be maimed or killed while using a spring compressor I personally constructed!

In the Jag-Lovers forum I posted all the part numbers of the threaded rod, high-strength dowel pins and nuts that I used from McMaster-Carr (mcmaster.com). Don't waste your time trying to drill a steel ball like I did. Just stack up a couple inches worth of heavy washers (Tractor Supply Co. stores carry some really nice, thick ones). Some 8 mm threaded rod is good for creating guide rods for the spring pan, which are especially helpful for keeping things aligned as you reinstall the spring. The only "fabrication" required is to cut the large threaded rod to length, drill a cross hole in one end for the dowel pin, and cut two lengths of the 8mm threaded rod. The only tools required are a cheap hacksaw and a power drill with a 1/8 inch bit to drill a pilot hole and a 1/4 inch bit to enlarge the hole so the dowel pin will fit.

Here are pix of the compressor I built - just imagine a stack of heavy washers instead of the steel ball:

Front Road Spring Compressor Construction & Use

Cheers,

Don
 
The following users liked this post:
93SB (02-03-2017)
  #4  
Old 04-22-2017, 07:39 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ohio
Posts: 68
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
Default front suspension

Thanks for the input and related posts in the forum.

I was able to build the spring compressor tool outlined in the forum. At this point, I have the driver's side torn apart except for the rear lower control arm. The bolt head looks to be about 1-1/2" (a little less) and does not want to come off. I will just plan to purchase an open end wrench to remove it unless someone has another idea. Does anyone know the actual size of the bolt head?

Also the spring has some rust at the top and bottom as all the paint is coming off. Am I good to keep them or should I replace them with everything else?
 
Attached Thumbnails coil spring compressor-jag-spring.jpg  
  #5  
Old 04-22-2017, 08:48 PM
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: The Beautiful Mid-South, U.S.A.
Posts: 16,600
Received 7,673 Likes on 4,280 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by dtrain View Post
I have the driver's side torn apart except for the rear lower control arm. The bolt head looks to be about 1-1/2" (a little less) and does not want to come off. I will just plan to purchase an open end wrench to remove it unless someone has another idea. Does anyone know the actual size of the bolt head?
I don't recall the size of the head of the lower control arm fulcrum bolt but I'm fairly certain it is metric, probably something like 30 or 32mm. If you measure it from flat to flat you can use an online inch-to-millimeter converter to get the measurement.

Originally Posted by dtrain View Post
Also the spring has some rust at the top and bottom as all the paint is coming off. Am I good to keep them or should I replace them with everything else?
You should be able to reuse the springs unless they're rusted so deeply that their integrity is compromised (possible but unlikely unless the rest of your suspension is badly rusted). Just clean the loose rust with a wire brush but leave a thin layer to react with a good rust converter/neutralizer (3M, Permatex, Loctite, Eastwood, Rust-Oleum, Griot's, etc.). Allow the neutralizer to cure the amount of time designated in the instructions, then topcoat with something tough like black epoxy spray paint (choose one that says it's flexible when cured).

Cheers,

Don
 
The following users liked this post:
93SB (05-13-2017)
  #6  
Old 04-22-2017, 09:00 PM
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Decatur,TX
Posts: 7,846
Received 4,115 Likes on 2,694 Posts
Default

Ospho Rust Treatment - Since 1947

https://www.evaporust.com/evapo-rust...vapo%20Rust%5D

I use these products with success.

I would use the Evapo-Rust first then a rust converter/protectant.

bob
 
The following users liked this post:
Don B (04-22-2017)
  #7  
Old 04-22-2017, 09:39 PM
Senior Member
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Port St. Lucie,Florida 34952
Posts: 359
Received 102 Likes on 77 Posts
Default

Soak rusty metal in plain old white vinegar sold at Walmart for about $2.50 a gallon. Soak it for a day and it will remove all the rust bringing it back to fresh metal and won't hurt painted surfaces.
 
  #8  
Old 04-22-2017, 11:02 PM
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: The Beautiful Mid-South, U.S.A.
Posts: 16,600
Received 7,673 Likes on 4,280 Posts
Default

In my experience, rusty metal that is cleaned completely then painted is more likely to rust again than metal that is left with a light coat of rust to react with the rust converter, which forms a layer that is very good at preventing future rust, especially when topcoated with a good paint. This method also takes less work than removing all the rust, so it's a win-win.

All the rust converters/neutralizers I've used work by reacting with ferrous oxide. If you clean all the rust away the converter has nothing to react with so it doesn't form the nice rust-preventing layer you want. See the instructions of your rust converter/neutralizer of choice.

Cheers,

Don
 

Last edited by Don B; 04-23-2017 at 08:31 AM.
The following users liked this post:
93SB (05-13-2017)
  #9  
Old 04-23-2017, 09:55 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ohio
Posts: 68
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Thanks for all the information. I'll plan to reuse the springs after cleanin them up.

Also, the manual I have says not to reuse the bolts for the pan holding the spring in place at the bottom. I'll plan to replace them but is a grade 8 enough? Should I go up to 10?
 
  #10  
Old 04-23-2017, 05:04 PM
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: The Beautiful Mid-South, U.S.A.
Posts: 16,600
Received 7,673 Likes on 4,280 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by dtrain View Post
Also, the manual I have says not to reuse the bolts for the pan holding the spring in place at the bottom. I'll plan to replace them but is a grade 8 enough? Should I go up to 10?
I think you could probably reuse the screws if they aren't rusted badly or otherwise damaged. If I recall correctly, they have a serrated flanged head that Jaguar calls "vibration resistant." McMaster-Carr carries them in a high-strength grade. For example, here's the listing for the M8X25mm size:

https://www.mcmaster.com/#92820a430/=17bshci

Cheers,

Don
 

Last edited by Don B; 04-23-2017 at 05:07 PM.
The following users liked this post:
93SB (05-13-2017)
  #11  
Old 04-24-2017, 06:16 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ohio
Posts: 68
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Coil spring insulator? They seem to be plastic pieces on the top and bottom of the front springs. Would like to replace them but can't seem to find them online. The Jaguar diagram shows them in the picture but does not list them for purchase?

Any ideas on where to get these?

Thanks
 
Attached Thumbnails coil spring compressor-coil-spring-insulator.jpg  
  #12  
Old 04-24-2017, 09:13 PM
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: The Beautiful Mid-South, U.S.A.
Posts: 16,600
Received 7,673 Likes on 4,280 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by dtrain View Post
Coil spring insulator? They seem to be plastic pieces on the top and bottom of the front springs. Would like to replace them but can't seem to find them online. The Jaguar diagram shows them in the picture but does not list them for purchase?

Any ideas on where to get these?
Hi dtrain,

The photo you posted is of the rear coil spring isolator, also known as a "donut," and it is made of yellow foam rubber. The front coil springs have hard plastic "packing and locator" rings, part 2 in this diagram from jaguarclassicparts.com. You should be able to reuse your old ones:




The parts you definitely want to replace are the front shock absorber isolators, parts 9 in the diagram. They're made of the same yellow foam rubber as the rear coil spring isolators and they harden and compress and crumble and lose their ability to function properly. The part number is MMD2144AA and they're widely available from our forum sponsors. For example, SNG Barratt has an aftermarket version for $5.71 each and you need 2 per side for a total of 4.

I recommend that you use the OE yellow foam rubber type and not the hard black rubber or polyurethane ones because I found them too harsh in our '88.

Cheers,

Don
 

Last edited by Don B; 04-25-2017 at 09:10 AM.
The following 2 users liked this post by Don B:
93SB (05-13-2017), cat_as_trophy (04-24-2017)
  #13  
Old 04-24-2017, 10:27 PM
cat_as_trophy's Avatar
Veteran Member
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Inverell, NSW, Australia
Posts: 2,846
Received 1,234 Likes on 777 Posts
Default

+1 . . . great post Don . . . good pic and great explanation and advice.

Cheers

Ken
 
The following users liked this post:
Don B (04-24-2017)
  #14  
Old 05-12-2017, 09:38 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ohio
Posts: 68
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Thanks to everybody who replied to all of my questions. Between that and all the information on this site, I had no problems renewing the front suspension on the car.

i did find the power steering rack is leaking... I've looked at rebuilding it myself and replacing with a rebuilt one. Anyone feel one is better than the other? How difficult is it to rebuild yourself?

thanks again for all the help
 
The following 2 users liked this post by dtrain:
93SB (05-13-2017), Don B (05-12-2017)
  #15  
Old 05-12-2017, 09:06 PM
jerry_hoback's Avatar
Veteran Member
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Michigan City, Indiana
Posts: 1,814
Received 374 Likes on 306 Posts
Default

I haven't tried rebuilding the rack, but I did replace one 3-4 years ago. At the time they were selling for around $300, but I was able to find a new one with no core charge for $150 by persistent trolling of parts sites. It is holding up well so far. It was an easy swap for what its worth.
 
The following users liked this post:
Don B (05-12-2017)
  #16  
Old 05-13-2017, 08:01 AM
Senior Member
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Port St. Lucie,Florida 34952
Posts: 359
Received 102 Likes on 77 Posts
Default

I have heard it's best to just replace it with a rebuilt rack rather than trying to do it yourself. I believe you may need some special tools to disassemble the rack and if the seals aren't installed properly it will leak. It's also very difficult to find anyone just selling the proper seal kit by itself. Another option is to check Ebay,as I've seen some rebuilt racks on there for my X300 for as little as $225 with a one year warranty.
 
The following users liked this post:
Don B (05-13-2017)
  #17  
Old 05-18-2017, 10:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: ohio
Posts: 68
Likes: 0
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Purchased a rebuilt rack and installed. Everything went together just fine. Had new tires and scheduled an alignment for the car today. The shop called me and said that their machine is telling them it is perfect on the alignment but when they drive it they feel like it might have a little bit of a drift. They don't specialize in this Jaguar and he said there are a couple of specialty parts that are needed for an alignment on this vehicle. He said it's probably very close to being perfect but he can't guarantee that it is and he won't be charging me for the alignment. My question is should I take it to someone that has all of the proper tools or do you think it's probably good enough the way it is right now?
 
  #18  
Old 05-18-2017, 11:13 AM
Veteran Member
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Victoria BC Canada
Posts: 1,871
Received 1,190 Likes on 744 Posts
Default

The front alignment is done by adding or subtracting (but often just by swapping L to R) alignment shims.

I believe the shop you pick needs to have experience with these old Jags and have these shims on hand to do the job correctly ..locally, I use a shop that specializes in front end and frame repairs, not necessarily just Jags (they'd go broke) but a shop that has done Jaguars before.

Phone around?
 
  #19  
Old 05-18-2017, 06:29 PM
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: The Beautiful Mid-South, U.S.A.
Posts: 16,600
Received 7,673 Likes on 4,280 Posts
Default

If I recall correctly, the Workshop Manual specifies that the alignment must be done with the front end a specified distance from the shop floor. Jaguar dealerships used chains and hooks on the alignment machine or shop floor to pull the car down to the specified height. I have read that a similar result can be achieved by having two adult men sit in the front seats of the car while the alignment is done.

Then again, I may be completely wrong. Check the Workshop Manual!

Cheers,

Don
 

Last edited by Don B; 05-23-2017 at 03:00 PM.
  #20  
Old 05-23-2017, 10:27 AM
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Decatur,TX
Posts: 7,846
Received 4,115 Likes on 2,694 Posts
Default

Again!!!!!!!! TSBs are your friend!!!!!!

bob
 
Attached Files
The following 2 users liked this post by motorcarman:
Don B (05-23-2017), Lawrence (05-23-2017)
 

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: