MKI / MKII S type 240 340 & Daimler 1955 - 1967

Compatible wheels

 
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Old 10-26-2018, 04:36 PM
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Default Compatible wheels

Are wheels from a series one XJ6 compatible with early Mk2?
 
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Old 10-27-2018, 04:14 AM
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primaz may be able to help with this one, he has looked a lot at offsets etc. he can probaly tell you what will work and you can check against the XJ6 spec
 
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Old 10-27-2018, 07:52 AM
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Last edited by Glyn M Ruck; 10-27-2018 at 08:21 AM.
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Old 10-27-2018, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Glyn M Ruck View Post
are they series 1 wheels?
 
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Old 10-27-2018, 09:22 PM
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They certainly seem to be. Ask matchlesspat the OP.
 
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Old 10-28-2018, 03:08 AM
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Originally Posted by TilleyJon View Post
primaz may be able to help with this one, he has looked a lot at offsets etc. he can probaly tell you what will work and you can check against the XJ6 spec
My 3.8s originally had the knock off hubs and I changed them back to the Jaguar 5 lug hubs. I would recommend to upgrade to a three or two piece wheel so that you can get a custom offset size so that you can increase the width of your tires and get better handling. The five lug hubs actually are the same bolt pattern as a Chevy. I went with a CCW three piece wheel with a 245 40 17” tire on a rim that is 8.5" wide with 5.75 offset going inside bolt pattern standard Chevy 5 lug” My car has custom front lower control arms with coil overs in the front and coil overs in the rear. If you want to upgrade to that setup let me know as that will enable the maximum width tires/rims. The front lower control arms will be about $900.

There are so many nice looking wheels that will match the look of the Jaguar style. Having a 245 wide tire enables the car to really handle. Without custom lower control arms I would say that at least go with a 7 to 7.5" wide 17" wheel so you can run at least a 225 wide tire. You can use one of those tire measurement tools found at tire rack or go to a local wheel store and they can measure it to find out the maximum offset for your setup. Go with a 17" or higher as that will give you more tire choices and enable more clearance for upgraded brakes if you choose to in the future.

 
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Old 10-28-2018, 04:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Chris D View Post
Are wheels from a series one XJ6 compatible with early Mk2?
that looks great but I am looking at a set of competition wheels 15x7 from an Series one XJ 6 and I need to know if they will fit
 
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Old 10-29-2018, 01:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Chris D View Post

that looks great but I am looking at a set of competition wheels 15x7 from an Series one XJ 6 and I need to know if they will fit
You may have to just see if you can find a local Jaguar owner or junk yard to let you borrow a wheel/tire as not many will want to use that wheel. To me some things to consider is that a 15" x7" is not ideal as there are not a lot of good tires now for 15" in general and you will only put a 205 wide tire. You might consider the later XJ6 from 1996 or so and newer as they are 16" which is a little better for good tires but now it is really the 17" or larger diameter that has more popular for good tires. Keeping small old diameter tires will limit you to low performance tires. Also the stock Jaguar wheels are not that light weight so there is likely an aftermarket wheel of similar design that is a fraction of the weight in a more current larger diameter size. You will never find a factory wheel with the ideal offset to maximize your tire size. You can fit a 225 tire on a 3.8s with the right offset so to me it is better to spend a little more for a lighter wheel with the perfect offset to run more modern high performance tires that are wider.
 

Last edited by primaz; 10-29-2018 at 02:21 AM.
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Old 10-29-2018, 01:51 AM
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It is obvious that the stud pattern & centre bore is correct for a Mk2. If they are competition wheels you need to find out what their Offset is for anybody to answer this question.
 
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Old 10-29-2018, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Glyn M Ruck View Post
It is obvious that the stud pattern & centre bore is correct for a Mk2. If they are competition wheels you need to find out what their Offset is for anybody to answer this question.
If one wants to be frugal, the stud pattern is the same as a Chevy so that would open up a huge pool of options but again fitting other stock wheels to different year makes/models is common for budget minded folks but you will have to often experiment yourself especially on makes like Jaguar as not as many people customize them, etc.
 
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Old 10-29-2018, 11:39 AM
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Indeed! ~ but nevertheless somebody that knows Mk2's intimately ~ I don't BTW ~ will know the offset range that will fit in a 7 inch. Especially someone that has raced them or is still racing one likely in the UK.

I'll even bet that someone like David Manners himself could rattle off offsets that will fit a Mk2 spats on, spats off, Coombs wheelarch etc,

Trial & error with offsets is not a good idea especially upfront as you change the scrub radius. The more positive you go with scrub radius by pushing the wheel out (reduced offset) the more detrimental to handling even though people like the stance. Negative scrub radius from design is more benign. You also change bearing loadings etc.
 

Last edited by Glyn M Ruck; 10-29-2018 at 12:29 PM.
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Old 10-29-2018, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Glyn M Ruck View Post
Indeed! ~ but nevertheless somebody that knows Mk2's intimately ~ I don't BTW ~ will know the offset range that will fit in a 7 inch. Especially someone that has raced them or is still racing one likely in the UK.

I'll even bet that someone like David Manners himself could rattle off offsets that will fit a Mk2 spats on, spats off, Coombs wheelarch etc,

Trial & error with offsets is not a good idea especially upfront as you change the scrub radius. The more positive you go with scrub radius by pushing the wheel out (reduced offset) the more detrimental to handling even though people like the stance. Negative scrub radius from design is more benign. You also change bearing loadings etc.
All you need to do is either purchase the tool which is less than $100 or go to a high quality wheel / tuner shop and then you just measure the space and you can then determine the maximum you can go inwards and outwards. I just replied and recommended that he see if he can find someone local to let him test fit as I am assuming he is on a budget? but maybe I am wrong? To me the best way is to measure with the offset tire tool then you can know what is the maximum you can fit; then you would need to spend a little more with either a two or three piece wheel to take advantage of those new found measurement clearance space you have. I have put extremely large tires on other cars and there is no issue with bearings wearing prematurely and that is going to 345 and 285 tires so on a Jaguar going up to 225 or even 245 is no issues at all. I do know that on my 3.8s you can fit 8.5 inch rims and run 245 on all wheels and without any custom A-arms in the front a 225 is no issues. I searched the internet early on when I got the car and found that the widest anyone posted was a MKII with 225 tires. I am sure that is not the maximum but what I found is that Jaguar owners were not that familiar with custom offset wheels and the typical suspension mods that most performance cars do on a regular basis. On a street car ideal negative camber is typically around .5 to 1.25 negative which will improve handling and only slightly increase wear on the inside. Those are very mild negative camber settings as most track cars are 3-6 degrees of negative camber and it still is really not much of an issue on bearings but more on reducing tire longevity but in racing whom cares. You do not want the car positive and having it at zero is not very good for handling. The cheapest way to get the car to handle is a wider tire and a good quality performance tire, then suspension upgrades will further improve it by providing better mechanics and the ability to adjust the setup more precisely.
 
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Old 10-29-2018, 05:04 PM
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Understood. I used to run our racing team! I'm not talking about tyre size. I'm talking about offset & scrub radius. The centre of a wider tyre is the same as a narrow one so scrub radius does not change with tyre size. It changes with wheel offset.

I always run negative camber on my cars & push the castor a little. BTW ~ only wider tyres within reason. What matters is the weight/contact patch ratio for sensible road compounds. Too wide can have adverse effects on handling & grip.








Primaz
"All you need to do is either purchase the tool which is less than $100 or go to a high quality wheel / tuner shop and then you just measure the space and you can then determine the maximum you can go inwards and outwards. I just replied and recommended that he see if he can find someone local to let him test fit as I am assuming he is on a budget? but maybe I am wrong? To me the best way is to measure with the offset tire tool then you can know what is the maximum you can fit; then you would need to spend a little more with either a two or three piece wheel to take advantage of those new found measurement clearance space you have. I have put extremely large tires on other cars and there is no issue with bearings wearing prematurely and that is going to 345 and 285 tires so on a Jaguar going up to 225 or even 245 is no issues at all. I do know that on my 3.8s you can fit 8.5 inch rims and run 245 on all wheels and without any custom A-arms in the front a 225 is no issues. I searched the internet early on when I got the car and found that the widest anyone posted was a MKII with 225 tires. I am sure that is not the maximum but what I found is that Jaguar owners were not that familiar with custom offset wheels and the typical suspension mods that most performance cars do on a regular basis. On a street car ideal negative camber is typically around .5 to 1.25 negative which will improve handling and only slightly increase wear on the inside. Those are very mild negative camber settings as most track cars are 3-6 degrees of negative camber and it still is really not much of an issue on bearings but more on reducing tire longevity but in racing whom cares. You do not want the car positive and having it at zero is not very good for handling. The cheapest way to get the car to handle is a wider tire and a good quality performance tire, then suspension upgrades will further improve it by providing better mechanics and the ability to adjust the setup more precisely."
Primaz
 

Last edited by Glyn M Ruck; 10-29-2018 at 07:39 PM.
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Old 10-30-2018, 01:23 AM
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Glyn,

What can I say, I love meat on the ground, my other car is a 240Z running a 345 wide rear tire on a 13" rim and 11" rim in the front with 285's and that extreme rubber will take a clover leaf exit at 80+mph and will out handle most every exotic car I have raced on the street and that is not straight line racing I have smoked dozens of Ferrari's and other exotics out handling so many cars as this Z will pull crazy "G's" . This car will handle so well that at 165 mph on the freeway you can do a two lane hard turn as hard as you can yank the wheel and it will stick; I raced a caged Toyota supra with that move and shocked the crap out of him and he had a full cage car on the street.

I am running 17" x 8.5" wheels with 245/45 series tires on the Jaguar .38s and this big boat can run pretty darn good thru the canyons and the handling is drastically better than those tiny 175's and I can race against high performance sedans and hold my own
 

Last edited by primaz; 10-30-2018 at 01:32 AM.
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Old 10-30-2018, 02:58 AM
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Originally Posted by primaz View Post
Glyn,

What can I say, I love meat on the ground, my other car is a 240Z running a 345 wide rear tire on a 13" rim and 11" rim in the front with 285's and that extreme rubber will take a clover leaf exit at 80+mph and will out handle most every exotic car I have raced on the street and that is not straight line racing I have smoked dozens of Ferrari's and other exotics out handling so many cars as this Z will pull crazy "G's" . This car will handle so well that at 165 mph on the freeway you can do a two lane hard turn as hard as you can yank the wheel and it will stick; I raced a caged Toyota supra with that move and shocked the crap out of him and he had a full cage car on the street.

I am running 17" x 8.5" wheels with 245/45 series tires on the Jaguar .38s and this big boat can run pretty darn good thru the canyons and the handling is drastically better than those tiny 175's and I can race against high performance sedans and hold my own
Yes ~ It's all in the lap times on real circuits not ovals. My Benz runs standard 245 rear, 225 front & I usually go up one/two sizes all round but drop in profile to keep rolling circumference constant. Two road cars that people can easily relate to are the Honda Prelude & NSX on their stock Michelins where the manufacturer got the weight/contact patch ratio correct. Over tyre them & the grip went to hell. While I'm an originality freak your S Type looks great & tastefully done. The S type could certainly do with more rubber than stock 185's & has the weight to shove it into the tarmac.

For those that like a semi original look but want a bit more rubber on the road ~ MWS UK have heard the plea with wider stock looking wheels. But scrub radius 101 still applies. Go too far in positive scrub radius & you suffer severe steering kick back & other maladies. Of course on a race track you will, within reason, tolerate certain negatives that you would never tolerate in a road car.


 

Last edited by Glyn M Ruck; 10-30-2018 at 03:26 AM.
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Old 10-30-2018, 03:23 AM
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If you want that OG look Dayton will also make custom sizes like 17" and other brands do the same. To me if you want that old look get a custom offset Dayton 17" x 7.5 or 8" so you can run a 225 or 235 tire.
 
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Old 10-30-2018, 03:56 AM
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I have not looked at what Dayton has done with offset. MWS has done it correctly for the stock arches & stock "king pin" line (yes I know ball joints in the case of a Jag). The problem with the S Type is the stock rear wheelarch & getting the wheel on & off roadside & these cars don't look right on low profile tyres. I for one would never role or modify the stock arch & people that go to a Coombs arch on an S Type make the car look ridiculous. Fortunately beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.
 

Last edited by Glyn M Ruck; 10-30-2018 at 03:59 AM.
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Old 10-30-2018, 10:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Glyn M Ruck View Post
I have not looked at what Dayton has done with offset. MWS has done it correctly for the stock arches & stock "king pin" line (yes I know ball joints in the case of a Jag). The problem with the S Type is the stock rear wheelarch & getting the wheel on & off roadside & these cars don't look right on low profile tyres. I for one would never role or modify the stock arch & people that go to a Coombs arch on an S Type make the car look ridiculous. Fortunately beauty is in the eyes of the beholder.
There is NO reason to change the S type body with coombs arch, etc. If you measure and put the right offset you can put a 225 to 245 wide tire on all four corners without rubbing the body, without having any issues removing the wheel on & off roadside at all. I have no issues with rubbing or removing the wheels. The value is that with a taller wheel you will have access to much better quality compounds and tread designs of tires that will greatly improve handling and the wider tire will also help tremendously. I average 40,000 miles a year daily driving my Jaguar and can not only keep up but out pace most modern performance sedans with ease thru the canyons with the improved handling.

Hey if you want to keep it stock looking with wire wheels that can be done while upgrading to wider and better quality tires. Dayton and other brands will make period correct style wire wheels that are 17" and with a 17" x 8" with the right offset you will easily run a 225 tire on a stock body with no body mods at all and have about the same overall height as the stock setup. The car looks way better with a lower profile tire and with the increased diameter you are not changing the overall height noticeably at all. Today all of the better quality compounds and treads are only offered in larger diameter tires. I would highly recommend no matter your taste to measure and find out the right offset, go with a 17x8 wheel and run a 225 tire on a S or MKII with a lower profile tire so you keep the overall height close to stock and you will enjoy the ride so much better. Then you can drive the Jaguar more often and have so much better handling.
 
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Old 10-30-2018, 10:29 AM
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Come to SA mate with the camber on the side of some of our roads with soft verges & you battle to get a standard wheel off the back with a standard jack. 245 never. Friend has been there done that. Car fell of the jack with the wheel stuck firmly in the arch. Your experience is not typical & certainly not typical with centre lock wires.

Typical comment on the S Type Register

quote

" As Nigel says I relieved him of his 205/70/15 tyres which I fitted to standard 15 inch Jaguar wire wheels.

No problems with fitting to the front as they just slide on and off but the back they are tight under the wheel arch. Not when on as there is a good two inch gap between the tyre and the arch. It is just when trying to take them on and off you have a slight problem due to the shape of the rear wing and the fact you have to pull the wheel almost off the spline before you can tilt it backwards then with a good wiggle remove it from under the arch. A Steel disc wheel would be easier to remove as you can tilt this back as soon as you remove the wheel nuts.

Anything bigger than a 205 would not fit the rear as it would not clear the gap between the wheel arch and the hub unless you put them on without any air in and then inflated the tyre on the hub."
unquote

One of the reasons wire wheel S Types have a narrower rear track than solid wheel models.

We are way OT.
 

Last edited by Glyn M Ruck; 10-30-2018 at 11:42 AM.
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Old 10-30-2018, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Glyn M Ruck View Post
Come to SA mate with the camber on the side of some of our roads with soft verges & you battle to get a standard wheel off the back with a standard jack. 245 never. Friend has been there done that. Car fell of the jack with the wheel stuck firmly in the arch. Your experience is not typical & certainly not typical with centre lock wires.

Typical comment on the S Type Register

quote

" As Nigel says I relieved him of his 205/70/15 tyres which I fitted to standard 15 inch Jaguar wire wheels.

No problems with fitting to the front as they just slide on and off but the back they are tight under the wheel arch. Not when on as there is a good two inch gap between the tyre and the arch. It is just when trying to take them on and off you have a slight problem due to the shape of the rear wing and the fact you have to pull the wheel almost off the spline before you can tilt it backwards then with a good wiggle remove it from under the arch. A Steel disc wheel would be easier to remove as you can tilt this back as soon as you remove the wheel nuts.

Anything bigger than a 205 would not fit the rear as it would not clear the gap between the wheel arch and the hub unless you put them on without any air in and then inflated the tyre on the hub."
unquote

One of the reasons wire wheel S Types have a narrower rear track than solid wheel models.

We are way OT.
I have had several flats over the last few years of driving my Jaguar and have zero issues taking on and off my 17" x 8.5" wheel with a 245 tire in the rear. The stock size you state of a 205/70/15 is 26.3" tall my 245/40/17 is 24.7" tall which might explain why it is so easy for me to remove my wheel? Also a 245/45/17 is 25.7" in height so going with a more modern higher quality tire with a 17" rim will be a little less in height to a stock 205/70/15 and you cannot get good performance rubber in that size. The 245 fits perfectly filling up the wheel well with zero rubbing and absolutely NO issues removing the tire on the highway with the tire fully pressurized.
 

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