XK / XKR ( X150 ) 2006 - 2014

Buffer for newbie

 
  #1  
Old 03-24-2019, 08:33 AM
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Default Buffer for newbie

2007 XK

I've never used a buffer on a car for waxing but would love to try. I need something that's good for a beginner so I don't have to worry about screwing up the paint as much. I'm not a pro and don't expect pro results but would like something better than my out of shape arms doing the work. Anyone use one they consider a good choice?
 
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:05 AM
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I used to do detailing. There really is a lot to learn to both get results and not mess anything up. I recommend heading over to autopia and reading up. You're going to end up buying a random orbital machine, like a porter cable 7424, a bunch of foam pads and various compounds. I'm partial to Lake Country pads with Meguiar's professional compounds(85-80) but there's probably better out there nowadays.
 
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Old 03-24-2019, 10:58 AM
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"Buffing" and "Car Care" are totally different monsters;

Buffing is the process of taking off a tiny layer of old paint with abrasive compounds, and it includes multiple passes with finer and finer compounds. This can be dangerous for the beginner, and result in burn-throughs and swirls, and make an OK car look like total crap if not done right. "Polishing" is the final step of "Buffing".

Car Care 'Buffers' are merely a complicated way to remove dried residue after waxing or a light polishing (see above). I find it easier and more convenient to do all my residue removal by hand.
 
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Old 03-24-2019, 12:21 PM
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I'm no pro, but I bought the Griot's 6" random orbital and been very pleased with it. One factor that made me choose it over Dewalt or others was that it was available with a 25' cord. With a standard length cord, I was worried about slinging the plug around while I'm buffing. Didn't want the plug pulling out or banging into the car. Plus I use my orange extension cord for yard work and construction projects around the house and it may have metal shavings or thorns embedded in it. So I thought the 25' cord was a very nice feature.
 
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Old 03-24-2019, 12:32 PM
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Buffing and paint correction should be left to the professionals. There is numerous new products for polishing and scratch filling thru nano technologies.

I use nano sealers and spray detailers like EZ Shine by Satin Gloss (the best water based spray detail IMO). Nano sealer by Ardex , and Wizards Shine Master polish and sealer. F11 works well but pricey, and I just used, Hydro-silex recharge on my wife’s black SUV made it look new.
 
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Old 03-24-2019, 12:41 PM
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If I ever get into this I won't be using my Jaguar as the test case.
 
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Old 03-25-2019, 09:51 AM
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It's not that hard to do a decent DIY job. Of course if you want a perfect unmarred glass finish, use a pro. First, go to YouTube. There are lots of instructional info for the beginner. Learn about pads, equipment and technique. Apex Detailing has some great vids. You should start with a Dual Action polisher. It's impossible to burn the paint because it stops spinning if you put too much pressure on it. That said, it takes a little longer to correct but for a beginner, it's safer. You need to learn what pads and what compounds to use (see Youtube or autotopia like 80sRule said). You will need to get proper pads and compounds for your application. This is where it gets tricky. I think to start, you should try an orange pad and a polish. NOT a compound. A polish is low cut and removes very little clear coat but only removes light scratches and swirls and oxidation. Since you were doing it by hand before, it sounds like this will be fine. I'm pretty sure you will be happy with the results. I think the Meguiars Ultimate Polish is pretty decent and available at the local stores. There are lots of polishes and compounds available and lots of opinions as you will see. Do one panel and see how it looks.

Once you polish (and this will take a few hours, Then seal it with your favorite wax or sealant. I've been using the Meguiars Ultimate Fast Finish. Easy to apply and lasts about 4-6 months (car is garaged). Good luck!
 
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Old 03-25-2019, 11:06 AM
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Buy a Rupes and you'll be amazed how easy and pro the results come out. Each pad is matched to a polish and couldn't be any easier. Very forgiving and straightforward. They're not cheap, but for a reason!

https://www.rupes.com/category-produ...oot-polishers/
 
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Old 03-25-2019, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Tervuren View Post
If I ever get into this I won't be using my Jaguar as the test case.

Just start with something finer than 80 grit.
 
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Old 03-26-2019, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by 80sRule View Post
I used to do detailing. There really is a lot to learn to both get results and not mess anything up. I recommend heading over to autopia and reading up. You're going to end up buying a random orbital machine, like a porter cable 7424, a bunch of foam pads and various compounds. I'm partial to Lake Country pads with Meguiar's professional compounds(85-80) but there's probably better out there nowadays.
A random orbital machine is the way to go, with the Porter Cable being an excellent choice. I've used their machine for about 10 years now. Random orbital machines (regardless of brand) are good for maintaining and enhancing the finish of paint that's in good condition, and can correct some minor finish defects.
 
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  #11  
Old 03-26-2019, 05:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Ranchero50 View Post
Just start with something finer than 80 grit.
I have a Porsche with prior body damage that is already in need of body/paint work.

It was my daily driver until the Jaguar took over.

I keep it because I enjoy working on it. It was a sorry case when I got it originally.

A real learning experience in working on cars as it has needed pretty much everything.

https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/www.jag...80e6e0d014.jpg

This October will be year four with the Jaguar, so glad to have made the choice to get one!
 

Last edited by Tervuren; 03-26-2019 at 05:12 PM.
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Old 03-28-2019, 07:41 PM
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I run a successful detailing business, and I have to disagree with everyone saying "leave it to the professionals". If you're willing to do two things, you can do well:

1. LEARN - DetailedImage has a great learning section, and they're my favorite supplier of detailing images (spend at least $500 a year and you get wholesale pricing that is LEGIT).
2. Spend the money - An entry-level buffer like the PC 7424, pads, a compound and a polish, and some microfiber cloths will set you back about $500 or so.
 
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  #13  
Old 03-29-2019, 12:18 PM
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I use a porter cable da polisher. No matter what you buy, just start with a gentle pad, gentle polish and low speed and you will be fine.
 
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Old 03-29-2019, 01:02 PM
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I mastered the art of buffing 25 years ago when all we had was single speed torque monsters with insanely aggressive wool pads and ridiculously gritty compound.

Here is the top secret tip: today a 'professional detailer' is more likely to do more damage than you can. In fact. you have to look far and wide, and spend a fortune to find one that will not reduce your paint thickness.

Today's highend buffers are foolproof, and near impossible to cause any damage, pads are so gentle that many of them do nothing. Compound is a dream of self-diminishing abrasives, it gets smaller and smaller till it disappears. Imagine using 3000 grit sandpaper that automatically turns into 15,000 grit. A good variable speed orbital will do less removal than by hand.

A commercial outfit would never make money or get any cars done if they used any of the above. They need to flatten paint quick. Also they have a perverse incentive...say that you have a scratch that goes 50% through the clearcoat. The only way to get it out is to bring the level of the entire area (or at least as big as 2x the diameter of a buffing pad) down to the level of the scratch (valley). Thereby removing 50% of the clearcoat, or reducing its life to half. Now you better hope you dont have the same scratch and have to see him again. Because his only incentive is to impress you. Whereas a guy like me would leave that single scratch.

Also keep in mind, this is not an art taught in school or handed down from generations, everyone is self-taught. So you better hope the education is not ongoing.

If anyone here wants to learn, it would be my pleasure to show you. I use a Metabo. While its a ultra-pro buffer, I can show how to use it as a newbie and get foolproof results.

Amazon Amazon

Pretty good video.
 

Last edited by Queen and Country; 03-29-2019 at 01:22 PM. Reason: added video
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Old 03-29-2019, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Queen and Country View Post
A commercial outfit would never make money or get any cars done if they used any of the above. They need to flatten paint quick.
Agree to disagree. Those of us that focus on paint correction charge accordingly. The ONLY way to remove/reduce scratches long-term is by removing clearcoat, the balance is removing as little as possible, AND knowing where you can't spare any at all (paint meter and understanding of the typical areas clear is thinnest). There are many successful detailers that do this. Pretty much all the featured detailers on DetailedImage's blog qualify.
 
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Old 03-29-2019, 02:50 PM
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That's the sad thing guy, consumers who dont know how detailing works, think that any swinging dick is good enough, they have never been to detailed image. And it comes down to money sadly.

There is another way to removing clearcoat that I have stumbled upon. I mention it as a potential revenue stream for you.

Take for example the area behind the door handle on an XK, or the trunk of a BMW, or the tailgate of SUV. They get scratches from wear. Wives will set their handbags on trunk to look for keys. Rings put some deep scratches in the handle area.
I dont just remove the scratches, because they will happen again with certainty and you will have even less clear to work with. I remove the light ones, fill the deep ones and cover with clear film to prevent future ones.
 
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Old 03-29-2019, 03:31 PM
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No setting things on the painted surface of the car, ever.

The XK has a fabric roof, or a big glass section on the hatch of a coupe. Or if the top is down just set the bag on a seat. All are fine for setting a handbag on.
 
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Old 03-29-2019, 07:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Queen and Country View Post
That's the sad thing guy, consumers who dont know how detailing works, think that any swinging dick is good enough, they have never been to detailed image. And it comes down to money sadly.

There is another way to removing clearcoat that I have stumbled upon. I mention it as a potential revenue stream for you.

Take for example the area behind the door handle on an XK, or the trunk of a BMW, or the tailgate of SUV. They get scratches from wear. Wives will set their handbags on trunk to look for keys. Rings put some deep scratches in the handle area.
I dont just remove the scratches, because they will happen again with certainty and you will have even less clear to work with. I remove the light ones, fill the deep ones and cover with clear film to prevent future ones.
I don't mess with PPF, but I do ceramic coatings.
 
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Old 03-30-2019, 03:01 AM
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I remember when I first started detailing my own cars in the early 90's, most of the products I used were purchased stateside when I was there, simply because back then no one much cared about doing this themselves in the UK and the products weren't available.

Personally now I've reached a time when I can get others to do it for me, not because I'm lazy but given it takes 3 days (in my experience) to detail a car properly it would involve taking leave in order to undertake the task.

Far easier on a new car than a used one as little paint correction required(*), so any new car I've bought have gone straight in to be prepared and then ceramic sealed.

The way I used to do mine was:

Wash
Ferrous remover
Wash
Taping off areas with blue automotive masking
Clay bar medium
Wash
Clay bar fine
Wash
Stage 1 machine polish
Wash
Stage 2 machine polish
Hand polish
Ceramic seal (only in the last 5yrs)
Glass nano protectant

With alloys I never clay barred (scratch too easily) them just ferrous treatment and hand polish/seal

As Q&C has eluded to, any decent detailer should take paint depth readings before they start and share with you...at least a couple of each body panel of the car, at the end of the process he should do the same again

* My Detailer/valeter has the contract for the local Aston Garages new cars, he advises that he has had to do some quite drastic paint correction on that marque, in one case he advised the dealer to send the car back to Aston to have two panels stripped and resprayed!
 
 
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