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Brake pads life

 
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Old 01-11-2019, 07:43 AM
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Default Brake pads life

I'm curious how many miles did you get from your original set of front and rear brake pads?
I'm at 31,200 miles on my R-Sport AWD, and have probably another 15,000 miles before I return the lease......
Any chance I'll make it?
 

Last edited by yidal8; 01-11-2019 at 07:45 AM.
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Old 01-11-2019, 08:37 AM
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Im surprised you made it 31k. Must do highway alot
 
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Brutal View Post
Im surprised you made it 31k. Must do highway alot
Actually mostly around town, and this area is very hilly. Checking the odometer, for last 6200 miles my average speed is 24mph, gas mileage 18.1mpg.
But, I use the down shift paddle technique all the time to slow down the car whenever practical, and all the way down to 1st gear if anticipating complete stops. I've been doing this with all my Jags, and so I assume it should help reducing pad wear.
It basically kind of imitates regen in electric cars.
 

Last edited by yidal8; 01-12-2019 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 01-13-2019, 10:56 AM
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Originally Posted by yidal8 View Post
Actually mostly around town, and this area is very hilly. Checking the odometer, for last 6200 miles my average speed is 24mph, gas mileage 18.1mpg.
But, I use the down shift paddle technique all the time to slow down the car whenever practical, and all the way down to 1st gear if anticipating complete stops. I've been doing this with all my Jags, and so I assume it should help reducing pad wear.
It basically kind of imitates regen in electric cars.
Adding load to the engine in order to save 4 set of pads sounds unwise to me. Pads are literally dirt cheap if you source 3rd parties.
 
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:01 PM
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Yes I was told long ago that brakes are MUCH cheaper than transmissions!
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Old 01-14-2019, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by clubairth1 View Post
Yes I was told long ago that brakes are MUCH cheaper than transmissions!
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i would agree of course if I owned the car. But itís a lease and engine/tranny/drivetrain issues are under warranty. Brakes are on my dime. The computer protects from overreving and Iím not doing anything that is forbidden by the owners manual. Regardless, never had any problems doing this with any of the 4 jags I leased. All 4 jags are/were very reliable with no mechanical issues.
 

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Old 01-14-2019, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by yidal8 View Post


i would agree of course if I owned the car. But itís a lease and engine/tranny/drivetrain issues are under warranty. Brakes are on my dime. The computer protects from overreving snd Iím not doing anything that is forbidden by the owners manual. Regardless, never had any problems doing this with any of the 4 jags I leased.
You are absolutely right in thinking that way from a user perspective, I am just considering it from a car lover and enthusiast perspective. Just pity for the next guy who takes on the ownership, hope they only lease it to another guy, then it would of no concern to anyone at all except the dealer.
 
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Old 01-14-2019, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by EmmanuelTam View Post


You are absolutely right in thinking that way from a user perspective, I am just considering it from a car lover and enthusiast perspective. Just pity for the next guy who takes on the ownership, hope they only lease it to another guy, then it would of no concern to anyone at all except the dealer.
I really donít see any issues doing this, if not abusing the car and only downshifting when rpm is below 3,500 for example. Stress on drivetrain is no different than driving a manual tranny conservatively.
 
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Old 01-14-2019, 01:52 PM
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yidal8, I think where people are going with this is by you downshifting and letting the torque converter "work" to slow the car down, you are heating up the fluid. How much, I don't know. Where the "life span" of the tranny comes into concern is that for every 10F warmer that you get the tranny, you shorten its life by half. I know it isn't quite that simple as the 10F has a time associated with it that you have to be at to have the negative effect. Keeping things down at a normal temp (say around 160F), the effects take a lot of time (hundreds, if not thousands of hours) at the raised 10F point to shorten the life. Where the issue comes is each time you down shift, you raise the temp for even lets say 10 seconds. On a normal drive home, you may do this downshift routine say 20 times. That is 200 seconds, or 3 minutes (rounding a little bit there for simplification). So, in a given year, you have added about a 1000 minutes of raised temperature, or 40 hours. Over time, this can start to add up.

I am not personally against it because if you pay attention to your car when the motor/tranny are cold, the car purposely leaves the car out of lockup for much longer to force heat into the fluid, getting it to the desired temp faster, which ironically minimizes the amount of wear on the tranny. There is a sweet spot in the fluid temp where you are not so hot that the fluid looses its properties, but not so cold that parts have less clearance and are not getting the ideal amount of fluid for lubrication.
 
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Old 01-14-2019, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Thermo View Post
yidal8, I think where people are going with this is by you downshifting and letting the torque converter "work" to slow the car down, you are heating up the fluid. How much, I don't know. Where the "life span" of the tranny comes into concern is that for every 10F warmer that you get the tranny, you shorten its life by half. I know it isn't quite that simple as the 10F has a time associated with it that you have to be at to have the negative effect. Keeping things down at a normal temp (say around 160F), the effects take a lot of time (hundreds, if not thousands of hours) at the raised 10F point to shorten the life. Where the issue comes is each time you down shift, you raise the temp for even lets say 10 seconds. On a normal drive home, you may do this downshift routine say 20 times. That is 200 seconds, or 3 minutes (rounding a little bit there for simplification). So, in a given year, you have added about a 1000 minutes of raised temperature, or 40 hours. Over time, this can start to add up.

I am not personally against it because if you pay attention to your car when the motor/tranny are cold, the car purposely leaves the car out of lockup for much longer to force heat into the fluid, getting it to the desired temp faster, which ironically minimizes the amount of wear on the tranny. There is a sweet spot in the fluid temp where you are not so hot that the fluid looses its properties, but not so cold that parts have less clearance and are not getting the ideal amount of fluid for lubrication.
Your explanation makes perfect sense. With that in mind, normal driving in hot climate like south/southwest US, will by itself have negative effect regardless, as transmission cooler usually can only exchange heat to the ambient air.
Also, this 8-speed ZF is used in many real high performance cars where the XJ is pedestrian in comparison.
 
 
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